• Research Skills

How To Evaluate Websites: A Guide For Teachers And Students (Free Poster)

Last updated April 26, 2019

Do you have students who need more guidance on finding useful information online?

Earlier in the year, I published a popular post called 5 Tips For Teaching Students How To Research Online . This is a comprehensive guide to teaching students of all ages how to research.

Learn about a simple search process for students in primary school, middle school, or high school Kathleen Morris

Let’s zoom in on a particular part of the research process — evaluating websites .

I don’t know about you, but I’ve found helping students to evaluate websites to be particularly tricky.

There are lots of guidelines out there but I wanted to create a resource that reflects an effective and natural  process , no matter what you’re researching or how old you are.

Scroll down to find a printable flowchart for your classroom.

Research Beyond The Classroom

Let’s remember that researching doesn’t just take place in schools and other educational institutions. You don’t just have to research for a project or essay. It’s something we all need to be good at to thrive in everyday life.

This is called information literacy which is defined by  Common Sense Education as,

 the ability to identify, find, evaluate, and use information effectively.

You’re probably always researching yourself? I know I am.

Just in the last week, here are some examples of where I’ve been looking for answers online:

  • At the nursery, I was looking for some plants for my patio area. I did some quick googling on my phone before buying to find out which plants would be most suitable.
  • A cafe I was going to visit with my family was closed. I pulled out my phone to find some nearby kid-friendly options that matched everyone’s requirement.
  • Research doesn’t have to be something you do on the fly either — during the week I’ve been researching different approaches to teaching global studies.

These sorts of everyday scenarios would be great to explain to students. Help them realise that research happens everywhere — not just in the classroom.

Bouncing Off Sites Is A Natural Thing To Do

Students need to know that the best site for them is not going to appear at the top of their search results.  Google’s  PageRank  algorithm is complex, and many websites use Search Engine Optimisation (SEO) to improve the visibility of their pages in search results.

Students also need to know how effective searchers behave.

Some statistics that bloggers or website owners like to look at are ‘time on site’ or ‘bounce rates’. A ‘bounce’ is when a person visits a website and quickly leaves:

  • Google keeps track of this information and website owners can view it in Google Analytics.
  • It helps them produce better content that will make people want to stick around.
  • And it helps Google know which search results are popular and should be displayed higher up the rankings.

Why does this all matter?

Students should know that it’s natural to bounce off sites. People often skim sites and quickly leave if it doesn’t offer them what they want.

In 2017, Brafton found that the average bounce rate for the sites they surveyed was around 58%. So more than half the time, people will leave a site almost immediately.

Bouncing away from sites is a natural part of researching. You don’t want to just settle for the first result you come across.

A Flowchart For Your Classroom

I’ve seen lots of resources and acronyms that are designed to help students evaluate websites, however, I haven’t seen something that describes an effective process . Furthermore, I think the first step is often neglected — if a student can’t read or understand a website then it is not useful for them.

Feel free to download a copy of the flowchart and share it with your colleagues. I’ll elaborate on the key sequence below.

How to evaluate websites flowchart Kathleen Morris

How To Evaluate A Website

1) open the site.

The first thing students need to do is open the site.

When looking through your Google search results, you may want to teach students to open sites in new tabs , leaving their search results in a tab for easy access later (e.g. right-click on the title and click “Open link in new tab”).

It can also be worthwhile to explain the anatomy of a Google Search result and the benefits of looking past the first few results. I go over this in more detail in my guide to teaching students how to research. 

2) Skim read

Next, skim read the site and determine whether you can read and understand the text. If it’s too complicated or difficult to understand, find another website.

Decide whether this is the sort of site that might provide you with the information you’re looking for. If the site is difficult to navigate, cluttered with ads, or has other red flags like poor spelling or inappropriate content you might want to leave straight away.

Skimming and scanning is the default way most people now consume new content so this now holds an important role in literacy education. A regularly quoted study from Nielsen Norman tells us that 79% of users always scan a new page they come across. Only 16% read word for word.

Scanning and skim reading can be worth practicing in the classroom. E.g. give students one minute to look at a text and then share what they think it’s all about. This is something that could be tried with emerging readers right up to higher level students.

3) Look for the answer to your question

If you think the site might prove useful, you now need to find out if the information on the site actually answers your question . You could use a search box, navigation menu, or pull up your own search box by pressing Control/Command F. Type in the keywords you’re looking for.

Stop skimming, and read more closely to see if this information is useful to you.

4) Consider the credibility of the author or website

If the information is there, you need to consider the credibility of the author or website. Can you rely on the information?

Here are some things you can look for on the website:

  • Domain — sometimes domains that include .gov or .edu come from more trustworthy education or government sources.
  • Author information — look at at the author bio or About page. How qualified is this person?
  • Design — we can’t judge a book (or website!) by its cover but sites that are cluttered, difficult to navigate, or look amateurish may be worth avoiding.
  • Sources — trustworthy articles usually link to other sources or cite where their facts come from.

5) Consider the purpose of the site

The next step is to think about the purpose of the site and whether it meets your needs.

  • Is the author trying to make you think a certain way? Are they biased or one-sided?
  • Are they trying to sell you something? Sometimes ads might not be so obvious, for example, blog posts can be written to promote a product.
  • Is the author’s tone calm and balanced? Articles fueled by anger or extreme opinions are not going to be the best source of information.
  • Do the headlines match the article?  Or are they simply designed to hook readers?
  • Is the author trying to educate the audience and present a balanced and factual picture? This is what you usually want.

6) Look for the date

Finally, it’s important to consider whether the information is current enough for your topic. You can look for when the article was written or it might tell you when it was last updated. Sometimes URLs include dates as well.

Does it matter how old an article is? Well, that might depend on your topic. For example, if you’re looking for the latest research on nutrition or a medical condition, the date might be very important. If you’re looking for some facts about World War One, it might not matter if the information hasn’t been updated in a few years.

If the site is no good, bounce back…

As the flowchart demonstrates, if you’re ever in doubt, just head back to your search results and try again. You might want to alter your search terms based on the results you’re provided with. Sometimes you need to change your keywords or be more specific.

When you overcome all these hurdles and find some information that looks useful and reliable, it can be a good idea to crosscheck the information. So, have a look at a few other websites to see if they corroborate the information you’ve found.

It’s important to remember that you can’t believe everything you read and it’s essential to consider multiple perspectives.

Studies have shown that students find it difficult to discriminate between fake news and factual information. This is very important to address but not the only aspect of website evaluation.

Like so many skills, website evaluation is something that people can become fluent at with practice. An important part of the process is thinking critically — not believing everything you read, not settling for any source of information, and always questioning.

Students need to know that anyone can be an author and publish online nowadays (hopefully they’re already publishing online themselves through a blog or similar!).

Like all aspects of teaching students how to research, classroom integration is key. You don’t need to spend large chunks of time on one-off lessons. Model your own searches explicitly and talk out loud as you evaluate websites. As you model, you could evaluate any old website or sometimes show a ‘fake site’ (check out Eric Curt’s examples of fake sites ).

When students can evaluate websites quickly, intuitively, and effectively, they’ll be on a path to thriving in and out of the classroom.

Want to learn more about the topic of media literacy? Gail Desler has curated some great resources on her site  Media Literacy in an Age of “misinformation”.

Leave a Comment

What tips or ideas can you add to the topic of website evaluation? Is this something your students have struggled with?

I’d love to hear from you! Scroll down to find the comment box.

Want A Free eBook On Teaching Students How To Research?

I’ve turned my popular post on researching  and my 50 mini-lessons into an easy-to-read eBook. You can download it, print it, share with a friend, and read at your leisure.

If you’d like this free guide, add your details here to sign up for my email newsletter and I’ll send it to you instantly!

I send out a newsletter throughout the year to share my articles, resources, and other interesting tips and tools I’ve come across. Of course, you can unsubscribe at any time.

You Might Also Enjoy

50 Mini-Lessons For Teaching Students Research Skills

Teaching Digital Citizenship: 10 Internet Safety Tips for Students

8 Ways Teachers And Schools Can Communicate With Parents

A Simple Guide To Free Images, Copyright, And Creative Commons For Students And Teachers

Learn how to teach students how to evaluate websites during the research process. It's suitable for kids in primary school right up to high school students. Includes a free printable flowchart for your classroom.

11 Replies to “How To Evaluate Websites: A Guide For Teachers And Students (Free Poster)”

Thank you so much! 🙂

' src=

Hope it helps, Tara! 🙂

Kathleen, Here is a giant thanks coming to you from Michigan, USA, where I teach at a homeschool co-op each Monday, once a week. My 11-14 year-olds will be evaluating websites this week, and I can’t wait to hear their thoughts on the fake website links. This should really be fun and useful to them. I gave my email in order to gather more of your excellent material for and anticipate even more success with next year’s group, once September rolls around. Really appreciate people like you and the sharing that you do.

Jayne Kozal Koinonia Homeschool Belding, Michigan

' src=

How nice to hear from you and thanks so much for your kind words!

I really hope your students find the resources helpful. Evaluating websites sure is a crucial skill.

So great to have you as part of my email community too. I email with a new post twice a month. The next one will be next week.

Thanks again for your lovely comment, Jayne. You made my day!

This really helped me!

' src=

From Paris Region, Rich content! I really appreciate your work, well done! Yahia

' src=

Thank you so much, Yahia. Stay well!

Thank you so much Kathleen. These resources helped me so much. The students are engaged and enjoying the class.

' src=

So glad it’s helpful, Safinaz. All the best!

Leave a Reply Cancel reply

Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.

Please log in to save materials. Log in

  • Resource Library
  • Evaluating Websites

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1nmLT61NRoqPLolfsSbX9Iza1ECANkPopqMljeTQcQPM/edit?usp=sharing

Website evaluation worksheet.

Website Evaluation Worksheet

This is a worksheet that helps students consider the websites that they are viewing.

Students learn to: 

  • Coverage 
  • Objectivity
  • Compare websites for accuracy and value

Website Evaluation

website evaluation assignment

  • Research Guides
  • A-Z Database List
  • Library Home

Evaluating Websites: Evaluating Websites: Criteria and Exercises

The capps criteria.

Before you use a website as a resource, evaluate it with the five CAPPS Criteria :

  • C urrency: Publication date or updated date.  The age of the content.
  • Authority : What qualifies the content creator or author to produce information about the topic?
  • Publisher / Publication : What is the reputation of the publisher, publication, or organization hosting the content?
  • Point of View : The way the information is presented.
  • Sources :  Amount of evidence provided.

Download the documents below for specific evaluation criteria and practice evaluating.

  • CAPPS Criteria for Evaluating Resources
  • Practical Tips for Evaluating Websites
  • Worksheet for Evaluating Websites

The Importance of Evaluating Websites

Putting information on the Internet is fast, cheap, and can be done by anyone with an Internet connection.

If you are using a website as a source in your paper or project, you need to think critically about where that information is coming from.  You don't want to base your paper off a biased opinion or cite a website that's simply a mask for advertising.

Instead, you want to find credible, up-to-date, relevant information that's written by an expert or an authority on the topic, whose claims are based in fact and supported by evidence.

To learn how to separate the good information from the not-so-good or downright bad information that you might come across online, start with the CAPPS Criteria outlined on the left.  Download the linked documents for specific criteria and practice using each principle.

Once you've read about the CAPPS Criteria , test your knowledge by comparing the pairs of websites in the exercises below.

Note: The following examples were borrowed from Castleton College.

Instructions for Exercises Below

As you compare the pairs of sites below, consider these questions:

  • What kind of site are you looking at?  Informational? Sales? Personal? Advocating for a cause?
  • Who is responsible for the information?  Look for an ABOUT page.
  • Which one is more appropriate for college assignments?
  • Which is more credible?
  • What factors helped you decide?

Compare the following sites.  Use the questions in the Instructions box above to guide your analysis.

  • Center for Consumer Freedom
  • Consumer Reports
  • The Effects of Pesticides from the Global Healing Center
  • About Pesticides
  • Factcheck.org
  • JustFacts.com
  • The Use of Drugs in Farm Animals: Benefits and Risks
  • The Dangers of Antibiotics in Foods
  • Antibiotics Used in Meat Pose a Threat to Public Health, Admits FDA
  • Antibiotics in Meat Could Be Damaging Our Guts
  • Community Supported Agriculture: A Secure Market, A Local Food Supply
  • Community Supported Agriculture for Meat and Eggs

Compare the following sites.  Use the questions in the Instructions box above to guide your analysis

  • Greener Pastures: How Grass-Fed Beef and Milk Contribute to Healthy Eating
  • The Health Benefits of Grass Fed Beef
  • About Antimicrobial Resistance: A Brief Overview
  • Antibiotic Resistance
  • Last Updated: Jan 12, 2022 1:26 PM
  • URL: https://hennepintech.libguides.com/evaluatingwebsites

Usc Upstate Library Home

Evaluating Information - STAAR Method: Website Evaluation

  • Website Evaluation

STAAR Evaluation Method

  • Information and Its Counterfeits
  • URL & What it can tell you

Evaluating web sites using the staar method header

Why Evaluate?

Whether researching for an assignment or personal curiosity the internet can be a very quick and rewarding fountain of information; it can also be a quagmire of personal opinions and misinformation.  All information you gather from the internet should be given scrutiny , printed materials like those collected in a library usually go through an evaluative and editorial process before they are published and collected in libraries.  The Internet has removed the restrictions and editorial process typical for print materials; anyone can publish on the web. 

To ensure that the Web sites you use as information sources are acceptable, you should ask questions about those sites, learn to question the information and the source. The STAAR method of web page evaluation has been created to help you find quality (or 5 STAAR) resources.  This is not a definitive list of questions but rather a method to encourage researching information and where it comes from.

Information, Propaganda, Misinformation & Disinformation

The Information and its counterfeits page will help you be able to distinguish real  information from its three look-a-likes, or counterfeits: propaganda , misinformation , and disinformation . Understanding the counterfeits will enable you to become a much more critical consumer of information.

Reading the URL

When evaluating a website there are several things to take into consideration, one of the first things to look at is the URL including the domain suffix   this can tell you several things about the website, the creator, the audience, the purpose, and sometimes even the country of origin. 

Other Evaluation Methods

  • USC Upstate LibGuide: ABC's of Determining Credible Sources
  • Evaluating Sources: The CRAAP Test This LibGuide page from Benedictine University uses the CRAAP method to evaluate sources.
  • Determine Credibility (Evaluating) This LibGuide from Illinois State University offers the CRAAP method and has a printable worksheet included

Is your website a S.T.A.A.R.? Can you tell if a web page is worth using or not? Look at the 5 points in the S.T.A.A.R. evaluation method to see how it stacks up. Give the website your own personal rating. The S.T.A.A.R. evaluation method was created by Laura Karas and the Librarians at the University of South Carolina Upstate based on both the A.B.C. and the C.R.A.A.P. methods of evaluating websites.

T = Topical

A = Authority

A = Accuracy

R = Relevance

  • Print Version of STAAR Method
  • Print Version of STAAR Rubric
  • Next: STAAR Evaluation Method >>
  • Last Updated: Jan 18, 2024 1:18 PM
  • URL: https://uscupstate.libguides.com/STAAR_Web_Evaluation

New : flexible, templated dashboards for more control.  Meet Dashboards

Learn / Guides / Website analysis guide

Back to guides

Website analysis: your go-to optimization resource

An introduction on how to analyze websites so you can optimize  your site's performance in relation to user behavior, SEO, speed, competition, and traffic.

Last updated

Reading time, go beyond traditional website analysis.

Start analyzing your website with Hotjar today so you can learn more about what people do on your website—and why.

Almost every guide to website analysis will tell you that you can evaluate a site’s performance by doing any or all of these actions:

Run an SEO audit

Test website speed

Carry out competitor analysis

Analyze website traffic

They aren’t wrong, and we cover the same practices later on in this guide. But we think website speed, SEO , and competitor and traffic analysis only ever tell part of the story behind your website’s performance.

The missing piece in your website analysis is understanding your visitors, users, and customers, and giving them what they came for so they don't just land on your perfectly optimized site —they stay on it, use it, and keep coming back. And that’s where our guide begins.

What is website analysis?

Website analysis is the practice of analyzing, then testing and optimizing, a website's performance.

Any site can benefit from some form of website analysis if the results are then used to improve it—for example, by reducing page size to increase overall loading speed or optimizing a landing page with lots of traffic for more conversions.

→ Eager to start improving your website already? Explore our curated list of website optimization tools !

A user-driven approach to website analysis

We can all agree it's important to have a site that’s fast, ranks well on Google, and doesn’t have major usability issues . We can also agree that it's equally important for your business to understand your competitive landscape and maximize the web traffic that gets to your site.

Standard website analysis helps you achieve all of the above—with a caveat; it won't give you a clear competitive advantage because your competitors are doing it, too . They all have access to the same SEO, performance, and traffic tools you use as well.

But here’s another insight you can leverage that’s 100% unique to your website: your users’ perspective.

Finding out how they got to your site, what they want from it, how they’re experience it, what’s working or not working for them— this will give you the holistic insight you need to build a great experience for the people who visit your website day in and day out.

5 ways behavior analytics contributes to website analysis 

Your users are the extra source of insights you need to grow your website and business—through interaction, they know what’s working, and what’s not on your website. Behavior analytics tools (like Hotjar 👋) help you analyze this user behavior and answer valuable business questions, such as:

Where on a page do people get stuck and struggle before dropping off?

How do people interact (or fail to) with individual page elements and sections?

What are they interested in or ignoring across the website?

What do they actually want from the website or product?

Let’s look at some of the noteworthy ways your overall website analysis strategy can benefit from including behavior analytics.

1. See how users interact with a page

Knowing the number of views a particular landing page receives will only get you so far—far more important knowledge lies in understanding your users’ behavior. What’s working for them on the page? Where are they struggling? Naturally, you’ll want to examine the functionality of your page(s) to uncover (and start fixing) potential website issues .

Heatmaps are a great way to understand what users do on your website: they aggregate behavior on a page by highlighting the buttons, CTAs, and other elements your visitors interact with, scroll past, or ignore. They’re an effective data visualization tool that can make an impression on even the most numbers-averse among us.

💡Pro tip: analyze how customers interact with your site or product with click, scroll, and move maps in Hotjar Heatmaps . Use Engagement zones to combine data from all three heatmaps into a single view.

website evaluation assignment

Visualize user engagement on your site with Heatmaps tools like Engagement zones

→ Find out how you can boost engagement with these w ebsite engagement tools .

2. See how users navigate your site

If you’re looking to increase web traffic and visitor retention for your site, you’ll want to watch and track how users interact with it. Beyond heatmaps, recording individual user experiences across several pages can give you more detailed insights into how your entire site performs.

S ession recordings show you how people navigate between different pages and help you uncover potential bugs , issues, or pain points they experience throughout their journey. They document various behaviors like mouse movement, clicks, taps, and scrolling across multiple pages on both desktop and mobile.

💡Pro tip: Want to know where to start improving your site? See what your users see with Hotjar Recordings and filter by Frustration score to view session replays of users who had a bad experience.

Watch how users behave on your site with session recordings

3. Get real-time feedback on how users experience your site

To collect hyper-targeted feedback on what users love and hate about your website, try introducing some feedback widgets. You can uncover how to better meet their needs when you listen to the thoughts they share about their experience.

Feedback widgets, like Hotjar's Feedback tool , can be used as a floating widget or embedded on the page to capture real-time feedback on how users feel as they experience your site. With Hotjar Feedback, you can effectively eliminate the age-old problem of not knowing just what the user experienced—no need to replicate any bugs, you can simply pull up the recording of their session to see exactly what happened.

💡Pro tip: collect compelling visual feedback by enabling users to highlight parts of the page they like or hate, so you can spot areas for improvement more easily.

With feedback widgets tools like Hotjar, you can find out what went wrong (and where) during a user experience

4. Gather targeted feedback

There are other website feedback tools that you can use to pinpoint potential pain points: maybe the user found a particular portion of text unreadable or a convoluted pricing page confused them. O n-site surveys— surveys that are placed across your website pages—will help you collect in-the-moment responses from users about what they’re actually looking for or trying to do. 

Using feedback tools like Hotjar Surveys is a straightforward way to make sure that your team’s decision-making includes the voices of your users. Connecting with users also creates a more human experience so they can feel more engaged with your business.

💡Pro tip: Hotjar has a survey for just about every occasion (and a bank of survey questions to borrow from). You can learn:

Why users want to leave your site with an exit-intent survey or churn survey

Where users heard about you with a traffic attribution survey

How easy to use users find your site/product with a website usability survey

What users feel about the content on a specific page with a content feedback survey

website evaluation assignment

Surveys come in all shapes and sizes—engage with your users the way you want to

5. Interview users to understand their experience in even more detail 

Analyzing how users interact with individual pages or site as a whole is a source of valuable knowledge. It becomes even more useful when you pair it with an understanding of why users take the actions they take.

You can collect more nuanced feedback to analyze by actually talking to your users—getting first-hand insights from them and asking follow-up questions to get to the bottom of why they aren’t ‘feeling’ your site, so to speak. If you’re worried about finding people to talk to, don’t sweat it: nowadays, products like Hotjar Engage make it easy to recruit interviewees and turn user insights into achievable actions.

💡Pro tip: focus on spotting key user engagement insights while Hotjar Engage seamlessly hosts, records, and transcribes your user calls. Don’t forget to have your whole team join the call.

website evaluation assignment

Use interviews to connect with your users and shed light on their more in-depth needs

Any combination of the website analysis tools mentioned above will help you identify drivers that lead people to your website, the barriers and the obstacles they encounter, and the hooks that ultimately make them stay and convert.

→ Check out the next chapter on user-driven website analysis for a more in-depth list of methods.

Start analyzing your website with Hotjar today  so you can learn more about what people do on your website—and why.

4 more types of traditional website analysis 

Traditional website analysis generally falls into 4 categories:

Search Engine Optimization (SEO)

Competition

1. SEO analysis and auditing tools

SEO analysis takes many forms, and the most common actions include:

On-page SEO audits

Website search engine ranking analysis, backlink analysis.

On-page SEO auditing helps you check your website for common technical issues that can affect search engine performance, like missing <title> tags or broken redirections. This kind of analysis is usually performed using specialized tools—some of which are automated to provide helpful suggestions (like Google's own Search Console), while others are highly customizable and allow you to perform advanced analysis (like Screaming Frog).

#This is what Screaming Frog looks like when we run it on this very page

If you’ve already dipped your toes into SEO, then you know just how important keyword research is for making sure people find your site when browsing search results. Search engine ranking analysis shows you where your website appears for specific keywords on search engines like Google or Bing.

Some rank trackers will calculate your website performance based on a keyword of your choice, like Serpbook, while others will also show you all the found keywords you rank for (for example, Ahrefs). Usually, these SEO checker tools also show how your website performs in different locations, e.g. United States vs United Kingdom, and across different devices such as. desktop vs mobile.

#The Ahrefs interface

Analyzing your website's backlinks helps you find out which pages link to your site and with which anchor text, so you can compare your backlink profile to that of your competitors. This information will also inform your link-building campaigns. Most SEO tools have a backlink analysis feature built-in (Moz, Ahrefs, MajesticSEO, and so on), but you can also find a list of your backlinks in Google Search Console. 

#The link profile feature in Google Search Console

→ Did you know this guide includes an industry round-up of the top recommended SEO tools ?

2. Website speed and performance tools

There are two main problems with slow-loading websites: users don't like them, and, as a result, neither do search engines. That's why speed testing is a second key area of website analysis.

A good general rule is to gather some data about web page speed—for example, what elements of it are too slow, too large, etc—and then use this information as a starting point to make the website faster.

There are many free tools available you can use to analyze website speed. Google's PageSpeed Insights is a good starting point, and will show you key speed metrics like First Contentful Paint (FCP), which is the time it takes for a browser to start displaying content. You can also use one of the following tools:

WebPageTest 

Website performance analysis helps you determine if your site is slow, fast, or average—but it also lets you diagnose why. You can also test mobile and desktop separately, and get an overall performance score and color-coded breakdown of the main areas and severity of the issues reported.

#PageSpeed Insights shows room for improvement...

By analyzing key metrics like page size, load time, http requests, image compression, and browser caching, you can access the data you need to speed up your site and give your users a smoother experience. Even better is conducting ongoing website performance monitoring , so you can make sure updates aren’t making things worse. 

→ We cover more website performance tools later on in this guide!

3. Competitive analysis tools

Almost all online businesses have competitors who offer a similar product, service, or experience to the same target audience. Competitive analysis is the practice of identifying and analyzing competing companies, quantifying the threats they pose, and finding opportunities and advantages that can be uniquely leveraged in your business. 

Researching competitors is a key part of SWOT analysis (Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, Threats). For ecommerce and online businesses, competitor analysis can be distilled down into two key questions:

How do our products/services compare to others in the space? 

What are our competitors doing in terms of messaging?

Manual research is an effective way to collect and analyze data relating to a competitor website. You can get started very simply by just recording a few key insights and SWOT points on a spreadsheet for easy comparison. 

#Source: shopify.co.uk/blog/competitive-analysis

Competitor analysis tools like SEMRush or SimilarWeb can also help you discover insights about how popular competitors' websites are (traffic volume) and how customers find them (traffic source).

→ Discover more competitive analysis tools in this guide’s industry round-up!

4. Traffic analysis tools

If you’re looking into your competitors’ web traffic, you’ll definitely want to analyze your own. Traffic analysis helps you monitor the volume and activity of visitors to your website, and determine your most successful pages and traffic generation techniques. 

Knowing where website traffic originates (e.g. from organic search or social media), how popular your pages are, which traffic sources convert better, and where on the website you lose potential customers helps you double-down on successful digital marketing campaigns and invest resources accordingly.

website evaluation assignment

Most websites use traditional website analytics tools like Google Analytics to measure website traffic, but there are plenty of popular alternatives available, like Matomo and Open Web Analytics (OWA). To understand the why behind the what, try integrating Google Analytics with Hotjar, or try us in combo with Mixpanel to discover funnel drop-offs.

The bottom line is, traffic analysis is your key to identifying opportunities to lower a page’s bounce rate and optimize your valuable funnels. It’s worth your while to analyze where and why users drop off on your most important flows. Hotjar Funnels makes it easy to highlight the best tactics from your highest-converting flows, so you can emphasize what’s working.

#Hotjar helps you easily identify where your users drop off throughout their funnel journey

→ We've got even more web analytics tools to share, including some ideas if you're looking for Google Analytics alternatives .

Frequently asked questions about website analysis

How do you analyze a website.

Website analysis can be done by using a variety of tools such as SEO tools, website speed and performance tools, behavior analytics and feedback tools.. Using them to analyze your site will help you assess its performance, compare it to competitors, understand how people use it, and find ways to improve the user experience.

What is SEO website analysis?

SEO website analysis involves auditing individual pages or entire websites to analyze how they perform on search engines, and then optimizing them to improve performance and ranking on search engine results pages (SERPs).

How do you analyze competitors’ websites?

To analyze competitor’s websites, you can use dedicated tools like SimilarWeb to identify market share, or SEMRush/Ahrefs to determine a website’s traffic volume, conduct keyword research, and plan a backlink strategy. Your analysis with competitor analysis tools should then be complemented with manual research, where you focus on researching your competitors’ website design, messaging strategy, and product mix as part of a larger SWOT (Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, Threats) analysis.

What is user-driven website analysis?

User-driven website analysis is a type of analysis that lets you collect and analyze data from and about your website visitors to improve the user experience—which can lead to increased traffic and conversion rates. User-driven analysis gives more context to the insights you’ve collected from tSEO and other traditional analysis methods.

💡Pro tip: learn which user-driven tools and methods to use for website analysis, particularly for ecommerce sites.

Banner

Evaluating Websites & Internet Sources

  • Criteria for Website Evaluation
  • Evaluate Social Media, Images, and Digital Content
  • Website examples
  • Website Fact Checkers
  • Information Timeline

Domain Names

DOMAINS/URLs

Domain name types and looking at the URL (or the DOI) for the page or site can provide insight as to the type of materials found there. Those most frequently encountered are: 

  • com – commercial business (the most common TLD)
  • org – organizations (typically, nonprofit)
  • gov – government agencies.
  • edu – educational institutions.
  • net – network organizations.
  • mil – military

Criteria for Evaluating Information

Consider the following concepts as you navigate information for your classes.  these criteria  can be applied to print sources, internet, and media.  ,  authority.

What are the author’s qualifications/credentials for writing on this subject? 

Is the author's expertise well established or easy to find?

How reputable is the publisher or sponsoring organization  .

  • To determine the authorship and qualifications, try a quick Google or Wikipedia search for the name or organization

OBJECTIVITY/BIAS

  • I s there bias?  Check for tone, use of dramatic or inflamatory language, and particular points of view so you know what you are dealing with.

Are the goals or aims of the individual or group clearly stated or transparent? 

Is the content up-to-date? Is the coverage outdated?

  • Check to see if publication dates are omitted or if information hasn't been consistently updated. A big difference between the date information was placed on the web and when it was last revised can be a clue as to it's credibility.

COVERAGE / SCOPE

What topics are covered and to what depth? 

  • Coverage may vary. Sources will provide a small amount of information on a subject or a great deal. Be aware of the needs of the research or assignment criteria, scope, and topic.

AFFILIATION

Is there a corporate entity (i.e. company, government, organization, university) that supports this site? 

Is there a link to information about the organization? 

Is there a transparent way to contact them , how might this affiliation affect objectivity.

Can you identify what audience the material is intended for? Is it directed to students in elementary school?  Middle school?  High school?  Is it for adults? Is it aimed at other experts in the field, or professionals?

How complex is the material?

Is the language or data used detailed and specific, or simplified, stability of information.

  • It’s here today but will it be available tomorrow? 

Can you cite it with some assurance that it will be found again?

  • Look for permanent links to the resources you find, often located under the "share" option.

PRIVILEGE / ACCESS

  • Are there limitations or gatekeeping as to who has access to the research, or who is able to publish the work?
  • Do you need special permission or do you have to pay to access the information? (Never pay, ask a librarian for help first)
  • Limitations as to who can access certain information can be impactful. Consider voices or perspectives that might be missing, left-out, or not prioritized in the work.  
  • Has the information been removed or extracted from the original source?
  • It's harder to tell if the information is reliable if it has been taken out of it's original context.

Web site evaluation video

From  Hartness Library CC/ Creative Commons Attribution license (reuse allowed)

CRAP Checklist for Evaluating Sources

  • You can use this list as a quick checklist for evaluating your sources, whether they are websites or from SVC resources.
  • You don't need to be able to answer all the questions but use the list as a general evaluating tool.

Check a Source

Additional help with evaluation

Some additional information on verifying websites:

  • How to Find If a Website is Legitimate
  • Google Safe Browsing site status
  • SIFT Website evaluation starter course: Check, Please!
  • SVC Misinformation Guide
  • << Previous: Home
  • Next: Evaluate Social Media, Images, and Digital Content >>
  • Last Updated: Oct 12, 2023 12:41 PM
  • URL: https://subjectguides.library.skagit.edu/websites

Lesson 2: Developing a Website Evaluation Tool

The purpose of this assignment is to challenge, test and ultimately come to general agreement on evaluation criteria for websites. This exercise is student driven, but don't be surprised if your teacher offers some guidance along the way.

Learner Outcomes

At the completion of this exercise:

  • you will demonstrate your ability to critically examine the quality of a web site by developing a web site evaluation tool.
  • you will be able to communicate to others your ideas about what makes a high quality web site and explain how you would evaluate a site.

Develop a website evaluation tool. Use the knowledge and perspective gained in Lesson 1 to develop a rubric for measuring the quality of websites. Follow these steps:

  • Pair up and take five minutes to share and discuss the merits and problems of the "good" and "bad" websites chosen in the activity of the previous lesson . One site should be a clear example of good design and one an example of poor design. Discuss specific traits that could be used to evaluate sites.
  • Join another pair and now, in a group of four, review your lists of traits that were generated in step one. Synthesize the lists to no fewer than four but no more than seven general traits that could be used to evaluate most any web site. As much as possible, make each trait discrete and clear. Combine similar traits. Eliminate redundant, obtuse, or invalid traits.
  • Once you reach consensus on the traits, decide on a numeric scale to use for judging how well a website rates for each of the traits.
  • Brainstorm a list of descriptors that define major point values on the numeric scale. What does a high score, a low score look like?
  • Now that you have all the components for the evaluation rubric, sketch the complete evaluation rubric with a marker on butcher paper. Write boldly and large enough for others to read from a distance. Your poster (evaluation tool) will be displayed on a wall.
  • Your instructor will now assign you a specific website to evaluate. After receiving the assignment, each person in your group will individually use this evaluation rubric to evaluate the assigned site. It is important that you evaluate the site without collaboration or discussion.
  • After all members have had enough time to evaluate, compare how your group members rated the assigned site on each major trait.
  • If someone in the group rated a trait radically differently from the rest of the group, ask them to explain why. Can the group persuade the radical, or the radical persuade the group? Is a compromise necessary? Try to reach a consensus score for each trait. Does the tool need to be changed somehow to make it more useful?
  • Decide on a reporter or spokesperson. Display your poster. Have the spokesperson share with the rest of the class how well your group's evaluation tool worked when applied to the assigned website.
  • As a class, synthesize the various evaluation tools into a single rubric. Find what traits are most commonly used. Sometimes groups refer to the same trait using different terminology, so the class must agree on what term to use (a groups' shared understanding of a term is called nomenclature ).

Great! Proceed to Module 2 .

CS4760, HU4628 & CS5760: Human-Computer Interactions & Usability

Evaluation assignment 1 – website and stakeholders, goals and task analysis.

Design and implement a website for your topic and evaluation documents. Recall that a website is a domain of HCI and your site will be evaluated accordingly. The website does not need to be elaborate, but it should serve the purpose of the users of your website. Users of your website are me (the instructor) the undergraduate students and the scientists. We use the web site to track the evaluations of the group applications. Undergraduate students will provide design documents for you to evaluate. When I or the scientists review your evaluations, we will want to refer to the undergraduate design documents, so your website should have links to their documents on a per evaluation basis. Undergraduate students are also users of your web site. They will refer to your web site to find your evaluation of their design, which they need to refine their design. Consequently your evaluation documents must be posted timely and kept current. All documents should be linked in your website in a format readable by all web browsers. Initially, the website will include a home page with your name, topic name and contact information. The initial website will also contain the interaction design supporting documents, (described below).  The documents are to be posted online by the due date.  The documents do not have to be a single file, but they should be recognized as a group and easily navigated in the website.

You may use most any tool or templates that you’d like to make your website. It should be a static website, meaning made up of html, jpg and pdf documents. There should not be a database backend. Consequently, something like WordPress would NOT be appropriate. The website should not have redirection, meaning in a .htaccess file. I have two goals for the website:

  • A central location to store your design documents that I can zip and save for posterity.
  • A media for sharing your documents with your client and team.

I do not expect anything elaborate in these websites in terms of styling or design. Your design for the website should pay attention to ease of access and finding documents.

Some resources for learning and making web pages:

  • https://www.w3schools.com/html/
  • https://www.quackit.com/

In particular, you may want to use Quackit’s online editor to get started on you first web page:

https://www.quackit.com/html/online-html-editor/

Design Supporting Documents

The goals of this assignment are to assure that your undergraduate group clearly understands the stakeholders, their goals and the tasks to achieve these goals. The document should contain:

  • Onion model of stakeholder
  • Description of each stakeholder
  • Stakeholders’ goal-influence table
  • Two primary users
  • Two secondary user

Simplified Hierarchical Task Analysis

  • Your notes from the interview with the scientist

You will attend your group’s interviews with the scientist and keep your own notes. You can ask questions during the interview but let the undergraduate group conduct the interview.

Stakeholder Analysis

Onion model for stakeholders.

Read Understanding Projects Sociology by Modeling Stakeholders for a brief description of the onion model of stakeholders. The onion model only need delineate four levels: system, primary, secondary, and tertiary stakeholders. Primary stakeholders are eventual end users of your system. Secondary stakeholders directly support the primary users or use the results of the application. Tertiary stakeholders are from the greater society and have influence on the project or are affected by the project. Developers of the projects are example of tertiary stakeholders, but developers have different roles.

Stakeholders’ Goal-Influence Table

The Stakeholders’ Goal-Influence Table clarifies the role of each stakeholder by delineating their goal and potential influence on the project. Stakeholder goal represent what the stakeholder hopes to get out of the project (which can be a personal goal). Stakeholder influences are contributions or constraints that the stakeholder makes to or on the project.  Stakeholders may have more than one goal or influence. Generally, stakeholder goals have corresponding influence associated with them and visa-versa.  Stakeholder goals and influences can be represented in a table. Each row represents a stakeholder, and three columns represent: the stakeholder’s generic name (role in the onion diagram), stakeholder’s goals and any associated influences. The association of goals with influences may not always be obvious, but try to find them.

Personas help to make the potential application users come to life by describing a hypothetical user in detail. The designers can use the personas to test the application on paper by imagining how a specific user would perform. Your document should include four personas: two for both primary and two for secondary users. I suggest that one persona be designed to represent user that will have nominal interactions with the application and the other that will introduce errors using the application.

Persona Documentation

Documenting the person should include:

  • Name, a hypothetical name that you make up.
  • List of important attribute, for example age and residence
  • Relationship to other people

A complete hierarchical task analysis (HTA) diagrams the different uses of the application in a tree, where the higher level are more associated with goal, intermediate levels represent the tasks to achieve these goals, and the lower levels represent actions to perform the tasks. Links in the tree associate tasks with goals, and actions with tasks. A complete HTA can consume lots of time and paper. I suggest making a simplified HTA which dispenses with links and uses intended tabs to represent the hierarchy.  The intent of the simplified HTA is to represent the views of the application by the different indentation levels. A single indentation level may represent more than one view. Try to represent all the views. In other words, the simplified HTA still represents all the uses of the applications but does not attempt to diagram the actions. You may need to use several indentation tables for application goals that have little in common. I suggest using a top-down approach to develop the simplified HTA. First list all the major goals or tasks of the application, then indent and list the sub-tasks to achieve the corresponding goal or task. Try to name the tasks and sub-tasks with words that might be used in the application view.

Document Outline and Format

Post your assignment document on your website. Do not email them to me. I will view your website after the assignment due in order review your assignments. The document will contain tables and bullet lists, but they should be supported by full sentence description. The document is not an outline or a note. I will evaluate the correctness of the document and also how well it communicates. An example outline:

  • Cover page identifying the document, you, and the undergraduate group
  • A very short description of the undergraduate system (one paragraph)
  • Stakeholder Onion diagram
  • Stakeholders’ short descriptions (one or two sentences for each stakeholder)
  • Stakeholder Goal Influence Table
  • Summary of the Stakeholder Goal Influence Table (several paragraphs describing the important goals and influences)
  • Simplified HTA
  • Summary of the simplified HTA, perhaps describing the application views.
  • Appendix: Your notes from the interview with the scientist

Email Me and Your Team

Email me (pastel at mtu.edu) when your website is up-to-date, so that I may view them. The subject line of the email should be

cs5760 Evaluation Assignment 1

Your email should NOT attach the documents. Rather, I will read them on your website.

Also email your team that you have posted the assignment to the website.

WRT 101 - East (Gousseva) Writing I: Website Evaluation

  • Books on Careers
  • Annotated Bibliography
  • Career Information
  • Streaming Video
  • Website Evaluation
  • Write & Cite This link opens in a new window

What's wrong with this website?

Domain names.

The URL for a website can tell you a lot about the purpose of a webpage. 

.com = commercial site

.net =network provider

.org =organization

.edu =education - school or university

.mil = military website

.gov = government website

.com, .net, and .org sites are less regulated, meaning anyone can register for a website with that domain.  .edu, .mil, and .gov sites are MORE REGULATED, and tend to be more reliable. 

Evaluating Websites Exercise

Get some practice at evaluating websites using the criteria in the left-side column.  Which is these sites do you think would be useful for academic research?

  • American Medical Association
  • Boilerplate: History of a Victorian Era Robot
  • Felines Reactions to Bearded Men
  • Library of Congress
  • Martin Luther King
  • Martin Luther King, Jr. Research and Education Institute
  • RYT Hospital - Dwayne Medical Center / Clyven
  • RYT Hospital / Dwayne Medical Center / Male Pregnancy
  • Save the Pacific Northwest Tree Octopus
  • The King Center
  • The Mayo Clinic
  • World Trade Organization
  • World Trade Organization (2)

Why evaluate websites?

When searching for information on the "free web", you need to be critical.  Here are a few reasons:

  • On the "free web" , anyone can post information, which can be unreliable and inaccurate
  • The amount of information online can be overwhelming; there are currently more than 124 million websites in existence
  • When searching the web, you get A LOT of results, many of which may not be relevant
  • Many websites may have an agenda, or may be trying to sell you something
  • Search results bring varying results, only some of which may be relevant for your research
  • Scholarly sources are usually not available on the "free web." They are located primarily in library databases

Click on the "Evaluating Websites" tab for strategies to help you evaluate websites.

The CRAAP Test: Guidelines for Evaluating Websites

When evaluating websites or any other information sources, use the following CRAAP test to help evaluate the information you find.  This checklist applies to any resource you may use for a school assignment, but keep in mind that some items are specific to websites.

Currency : The timeliness of the information.  

  • When was the information published or posted?
  • Has the information been revised or updated?
  • Does your topic require current information, or will older sources work as well?
  • Are the links functional?

R elevance : The importance of the information for your needs.

  • Does the information relate to your topic or answer your question?
  • Who is the intended audience?
  • Is the information at an appropriate level (i.e. not too elementary or advanced for your needs)?
  • Have you looked at a variety of sources before determining this is one you will use?
  • Would you be comfortable citing this source in your research paper?

A uthority : The source of the information.

  • Who is the author/publisher/source/sponsor?
  • What are the author's credentials or organizational affiliations?
  • Is the author qualified to write on the topic?
  • Is there contact information, such as a publisher or email address?
  • .com - commercial site
  • .edu - school or university site
  • .gov - government website
  • .org - for-profit or non-profit organization site

A ccuracy : The reliability, truthfulness and correctness of the content.

  • Where does the information come from?
  • Is the information supported by evidence?
  • Has the information been reviewed or refereed?
  • Can you verify any of the information in another source or from personal knowledge?
  • Does the language or tone seem unbiased and free of emotion?
  • Are there spelling, grammar or typographical errors?

  P urpose : The reason the information exists.

  • What is the purpose of the information? Is it to inform, teach, sell, entertain or persuade?
  • Do the authors/sponsors make their intentions or purpose clear?
  • Is the information fact, opinion or propaganda?
  • Does the point of view appear objective and impartial?
  • Are there political, ideological, cultural, religious, institutional or personal biases?

The CRAAP test is provided by the Meriam Library California State University, Chico.

Scholarly vs Non-Scholarly Resources

Your instructor may ask your to use only scholarly resources for your paper.  What's the difference between a scholarly or non-scholarly resource?

Scholarly (peer-reviewed) sources include encyclopedias, books, and articles published in scholarly journals.  These sources are reviewed by a panel of experts in that particular field, and are often published by a professional association or a university press.  These experts ensure the information published is credible before accepting it for publication.

Non-Scholarly sources include websites , magazines, newspapers, and books that undergo no expert review prior to publishing.

Check with your instructor if you plan to use non-scholarly sources and use the CRAAP test to evaluate them.

What about Wikipedia?

Wikipedia is a free, online encyclopedia that contains articles about nearly any topic.  It may be tempting to use it as a resource for an assignment, but keep in mind that most instructors WILL NOT accept wikipedia as an acceptable source.  Why?  Wikipedia entries can be edited by anyone that has access to a computer and creates a wikipedia account.  This often compromises the quality of information that may appear in Wikipedia entries. The last thing you want to do is to use false information in your assignments.

So what do you do?  Use Wikipedia as a starting point for your research, but, if you want to use information from it, try to verify it in another reputable source instead.

See the video below for more about Wikipedia:

  • << Previous: Streaming Video
  • Next: Write & Cite >>
  • Last Updated: Jan 22, 2024 3:46 PM
  • URL: https://libguides.pima.edu/wrt101Gousseva

QSEN logo

Quality and Safety Education for Nurses

Strategy submission, website evaluation exercise.

Assistant Clinical Professor

Elaine L. Smith RN, MSN, MBA, CNAA, QSEN Project Manager, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, School of Nursing, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, US

Institution:

UCSF, School of Nursing, Dept. of Physiological Nursing

[email protected]

Competency Categories:

Evidence-Based Practice, Informatics, Patient-Centered Care, Quality Improvement, Safety

Learner Level(s):

New Graduates/Transition to Practice, Pre-Licensure ADN/Diploma, Pre-Licensure BSN, RN to BSN

Learner Setting(s):

Strategy Type:

Independent Study

Learning Objectives:

Students will:

  • demonstrate skill in locating and accessing electronic information
  • demonstrate skills in evaluating health-related information found on the internet
  • demonstrate skills at teaching patient/family strategies for evaluating web-based information
  • demonstrate attitudes and behaviors that show that they are beginning to internalize responsibility of  professional nurse in ensuring patients/clients receive quality information

Strategy Overview:

Students are assigned to identify learning needs of patients/clients she/he is assigned to that day and to search for web sites that address these needs. Using either of the two resources listed below1,2, and/or other similar resources, the students evaluate the quality of the web sites and complete the Health Information on the Internet: Evaluation Criteria form . In a clinical conference, students discuss their process in finding and evaluating websites and compile a list of high quality websites that can be shared with the nurses on the unit(s). In discussion with the patient/family, students then present the information they have found and describe the evaluation criteria that should be used when searching for health information on the internet.

For an alternative classroom-based assignment, faculty can select 5-10 websites at random for students to evaluate.

  • Health Summit Working Group’s policy paper, Criteria for Assessing the Quality of Health Information on the Internet http://hitiweb.mitretek.org/docs/policy.html#top (accessed 3/18/2006)
  • Internet Healthcare Coalition, Tips for Healthy Surfing Online:Finding Quality Health Information on the Internet http://www.ihealthcoalition.org/content/tips.html (accessed 3/18/2006)

Submitted Materials:

Additional Materials:

Evaluation Description:

Students are evaluated on how thoroughly they address the criteria for website evaluation.

In my experience students are always eager to use the internet as a source of information but less adept at evaluating the content they find there. This assignment shows then that, as healthcare professionals, they can no longer take information at face value but must apply reasonable evaluation criteria. The students are at first frustrated but ultimately find the exercise to be eye-opening and valuable in preparing them to best serve their patients. I am tempted to make students complete a web evaluation tool each time the use a website as a reference for a paper or other assignment!

Website Evaluation Assignment Example – 5 Criteria and Checklist

  • A Detailed Guide for Freshers on Video Subtitle Writing

Top Strategies to Write Convincing Paper for College?

  • Future of Free Internet For World Project by Facebook

Creative Technologies

Creative Technologies

Website Evaluation Assignment Example - 5 Criteria and Checklist

Nowadays, information is not far away from the ones looking for it. Advancements in internet technology have made the world a global village. People can access any web page by sitting in any corner of the world. The only problem is how to perform website evaluation assignment. In simple words, finding knowledge is easy, but finding quality knowledge has become challenging. It requires the evaluators to check the websites based on some criteria. If you are serious about finding quality content, then you must follow some evaluation criteria. But what exactly the checklist or criteria is? Today’s article is all about answering this question.

5 Checklists

A website’s content is what makes it known to the general public. The good is the content; the more is the website’s rating. Still, many websites upload content that they are not authorised to do. Thus, the readers must be able to evaluate the website based on some website evaluation assignment criteria. Below are the five evaluation criteria.

Now the brief description of each evaluation criteria is given below;

Because of the hodge-podge of the information on the internet, it is very important to know about the accuracy of the content. Accuracy allows you to measure the factual information present on the website. It tells you that the information listed here is also listed on another credible source. The sources of the information must also be there so that you can go directly to the origin of the content. It means that there must be a list of all the references used in the content that can verify its originality  

While performing website evaluation assignment, checking for spelling and grammatical mistakes also come under accuracy. You can hire assignment writing services UK in case of any problem in developing the grammar accuracy. Mostly, the website content is free from grammatical errors, and the criteria of accuracy confirm it. If the website does not meet the standards of accuracy, the content is not authentic. Thus, you must check for the accuracy of the content first.  

Authority comes at second place in website evaluation assignments. This criterion checks for the ownership of the content. The content owner’s ownership and legitimacy are also important to know. The website evaluator looks for the answer to the questions given below;

  • Who is responsible for the content on the website?
  • Is there any way of verifying the legitimacy and authenticity of the organisation, individual or network?
  • Is there any sign of the author’s qualifications on the website?
  • Does the URL reveal anything about the publisher? (.com, .gov, .edu etc.)

The answers to these questions confirm the authority of the website. The authorised web content attracts more readers and gets high viewership. Thus, you must apply this check when evaluating the websites.

The relevance of the content to the website is also very important. Relevance means that content on the website addresses the topic properly. Sometimes websites deviate from the original topic and get too promotional. Undoubtedly, every website is out there to make some money. But along with making money, the relevance of the content must also be there. To evaluate website content effectively for relevance, you must ask yourself the following questions:

  • Does the information present on the web relate to the topic?
  • Does it address its intended audience?
  • Is the information at the basic, intermediate, or advanced level?
  • Does the information serve its purpose in an effective way?
  • Would you be comfortable using the information in any of your research?

The answer to these questions is, in fact, the relevance. One must check for it while performing a website evaluation assignment.

Everything happens for a purpose. A particular is out there on the internet to serve a purpose. The purpose of the content on the website can be anything like teaching, persuading or guiding. For example, nowadays, government websites have a tab on the information of COVID-19. You can find the information on COVID-19 cases and their preventions on that page. See, the content serves the purpose of spreading awareness among the people about COVID-19. Thus, the point of purpose in website evaluation assignments holds much importance. Below are some of the questions that can assist you in this.

  • What is the purpose of the information?  To inform? To teach? To persuade?
  • Does the author make his clear?
  • Is the basis of information a fact, opinion or propaganda?

It is the last criteria of evaluation of websites. It discusses the timeliness of the information. The currency criterion assists all other points mentioned above. In simple words, the current criterion tells you about the content and update history of the website. Below are some of the questions that may assist you in your evaluation.

  • Does the web page have any date of publication of the content?
  • Is there any date for the first publication of the information on the internet?
  • When was the page last updated?

An answer to these questions surely helps you during website evaluation assignments. There must be an answer to all these questions on the web page.

After a detailed discussion on all the five criteria, let’s look at an example of web evaluation. I will evaluate the website based on the five points mentioned above.

Website name : poynter.org

URL :https://www.poynter.org/educators-students/2017/7-ways-to-avoid-jargon-in-your-writing/

Domain : .org (organisation)

Accuracy : the sources are present on the website. The sources directly relate to the topic. It means that this website passes the accuracy criteria.

Authority : The author’s information is on the website, i.e., Vicki Kreuger. The information about the qualifications and authenticity is also given.

Relevance : The website’s content is also very relevant to the topic. It engages the audience, and writing is of intermediate level.

Purpose : The purpose of the website is to inform the readers about the use of Jargon in different writings.

Currency : The publication date is also on the page, i.e., 14 June 2017.

All in all, by considering the 5 points mentioned above, you can perform a website evaluation assignment in a better way. Every evaluator must employ these points in their evaluation of web pages.

Related News

write an effective paper

Some Free Tools to Analyze Your Research Data for Thesis

Select Product

11.17.2 build 45000

Fixed issues

Known issues

Third party notices

License Server

Licensing elements

Licensing data collection programs

Citrix Licensing Call Home data elements

Citrix Licensing CEIP data elements

Citrix License Server Event data elements

Citrix Licensing Telemetry data elements

Licensing services

Licensing technical overview

License files

License types

Transition and Trade-Up (TTU) with Citrix Universal Subscription

System requirements for Citrix licensing

Getting started

How to obtain your license files

Customer Success Services Renewal licenses

Citrix Licensing Manager

Dashboard and Historical Use

Install licenses

Update licenses

Product information

Register your Citrix License Server

Manage Licenses on MyAccount

Administer licenses without a console

Licensing commands for advanced operations

Upgrade the License Server

Configure clustered License Servers

Disaster recovery backup and redundancy

Troubleshooting your License Server

Frequently asked questions

Document History

This content has been machine translated dynamically.

Dieser Inhalt ist eine maschinelle Übersetzung, die dynamisch erstellt wurde. (Haftungsausschluss)

Cet article a été traduit automatiquement de manière dynamique. (Clause de non responsabilité)

Este artículo lo ha traducido una máquina de forma dinámica. (Aviso legal)

此内容已经过机器动态翻译。 放弃

このコンテンツは動的に機械翻訳されています。 免責事項

이 콘텐츠는 동적으로 기계 번역되었습니다. 책임 부인

Este texto foi traduzido automaticamente. (Aviso legal)

Questo contenuto è stato tradotto dinamicamente con traduzione automatica. (Esclusione di responsabilità))

This article has been machine translated.

Dieser Artikel wurde maschinell übersetzt. (Haftungsausschluss)

Ce article a été traduit automatiquement. (Clause de non responsabilité)

Este artículo ha sido traducido automáticamente. (Aviso legal)

この記事は機械翻訳されています. 免責事項

이 기사는 기계 번역되었습니다. 책임 부인

Este artigo foi traduzido automaticamente. (Aviso legal)

这篇文章已经过机器翻译. 放弃

Questo articolo è stato tradotto automaticamente. (Esclusione di responsabilità))

Translation failed!

Your Citrix product uses one of the license types described in this document. Some products allow you to select more than one type of license. Ensure that you are aware of the licenses that are purchased and how they are consumed. Some license types offer license overdraft and supplemental grace period as a feature.

The Citrix License Server supports any Citrix products that require Citrix licenses. For more information, see Products and license models .

  • User/device license

In user/device type licensing the License Server dynamically assigns a license to a user or a device based on the usage and monitors license consumption. The default assignment is a user license. The license server considers each connection and its optimization engine. It ensures that the smallest number of licenses are used based on the userID and deviceID.

The license server truncates domains by default so that [email protected] and [email protected] are treated as a same user. For more information, see Disable the domain name truncation .

Note: Domain membership doesn’t play a role in how licenses are served. A license server can host licenses for any product that can connect to it across the network. Workgroup or Domain membership primarily controls who can be configured as License Server Administrators to access the Citrix Licensing Manager.
  • When a license is assigned to a user. A user license allows the user to access from an unlimited number of devices. A licensed user requires a unique user ID, such as an Active Directory entry.

For example, the user can connect to their desktops and applications using multiple devices such as desktop, laptop, smartphone, or thin client. A licensed user can connect to multiple instances of Citrix Virtual Desktops concurrently.

  • When a license is assigned to a device. A device license is assigned to a device when two or more users connect to an exclusively shared endpoint device.

For example, single shared devices such as a kiosk or a workstation in a call center environment used by multiple users.

The following table illustrates how user/device licenses are assigned to non-shared devices and exclusively shared devices. Blue color cells display user licenses, where the devices are not shared. Green color cells display device licenses, where the devices are exclusively shared.

User/device license assignment

License assignment period

When users or devices connect to an application or desktop, they consume a license for a 90 day assignment period. The license assignment period begins when a connection is established. The period is renewed to a full 90 days during the life of the connection. The user/device lease for the license assignment will expire in 90 days after the last connected user or device disconnects.

Release licenses for users or devices

You can release a license for a user only when:

  • The employee is no longer associated with the company.
  • The employee is on an extended leave of absence.

You can release licenses for devices only when the devices are out of service.

For more information, see Display or release licenses for users or devices .

  • License optimization

The License Server uses the optimization process to determine how to minimize license consumption. This optimization is based on licenses in use and connections to the License Server. The License Server optimizes every five seconds until there are 5000 unique connections. Connections at 5000 and above optimization occurs every five minutes. Optimization might delay status information until the next optimization, impacting when license usage statistics are updated in various consoles.

Optimization occurs every five seconds for 1-4999 users and every five minutes for 5000 or more users.

Optimization is not consumption. The following table is the example of connections and optimization time when optimization occurs.

Note: If you have a large deployment, optimization can be CPU intensive depending on the number of unique connections. We recommend using machines with multiple cores. Customers hosting many license servers or shared disk systems see high read and write operations. Even if all the license servers have less than 5000 users, each can optimize every 5 seconds and write cache data to disk. You cannot disable the optimization or change its frequency.
  • Concurrent license

Concurrent license is not tied to a specific userID, Active Directory account, or a domain. Concurrent licensing is based on the originating endpoint deviceID. A user or endpoint device could connect to multiple sessions and use a single license.

You start a product that requests a license and it is checked out to a unique endpoint deviceID. If you log off or disconnect from the session, the license is checked in and made available for a new user. Note, we don’t license per session.

Multiple sessions at different computers use multiple licenses. Each time you start a Citrix session from various devices, a license is checked out until you close that session. At that point, the license is checked back in.

For example, a user starts a session from one computer and then starts another from a different computer before closing the first session. Two licenses are checked out.

License Servers do not communicate with each other. If you run multiple License Servers, you might consume more than one license (for example, with load balancing). If you are using load balancing, we recommend that the product servers point to the same License Server.

Different editions consume different licenses. Two licenses are consumed, if you use the same client to connect to applications running on an Advanced edition and Premium edition each.

Same product, edition, and license model consume single license. If you make multiple connections from a single device to different product servers configured with the same edition and license model and pointing to the same License Server. Only one license is consumed.

For license sharing, pass-through connections on Citrix Virtual Apps and Desktops pass the endpoint client device ID to the product server. If you connect to a single product, edition, and license model with a shared License Server, all connections share a single license.

A user connects from a single device to two product servers that are the same edition but different versions. One or two licenses might be consumed based on the order in which the user makes the connections.

For example, the two servers are Citrix Virtual Apps and Desktops 7 1811 and Citrix Virtual Apps and Desktops 7 1903:

  • The user connects to Citrix Virtual Apps and Desktops 7 1811 first. Two licenses might be consumed. An older license first, for the older product, and then a newer license because version 1903 requires a newer Customer Success Services date. For more information, see Customer Success Services .
  • The user connects to Citrix Virtual Apps and Desktops 7 1903 first. Only one license is consumed because the Customer Success Services date required by version 1903 is compatible with all older product versions.
  • If the Customer Success Service date of all the installed licenses are compatible with all the product versions then a single license is required for each connecting device.

RDP connections consume a license but RDP connections to a console do not consume a license.

If the number of connections exceed the purchased and available standalone concurrent licenses, users are denied access unless the supplemental grace period is enabled. For more information, see Supplemental grace period .

  • Per user license

A licensed user requires a unique user ID, such as an Active Directory entry. When a license is assigned to a user, the license allows the user to connect to their desktops and applications using multiple devices. A User license is assigned to the User and not to the User’s devices.

Note: These licenses are only user licenses and are not the same as user/device licenses.
  • A user can connect to multiple devices such as a desktop computer, laptop, netbook, smartphone, or thin client. A licensed user can connect to multiple instances of Citrix Virtual Desktops concurrently.

When a user connects to multiple devices, a user license is consumed for the 90 day assignment period. The license assignment period begins when a connection is made. The period is renewed to the full 90 days during the life of the connection. The device lease for the license assignment will expire in 90 days after the last connected user or device disconnects.

  • Per device license

A licensed device requires a unique device ID and any individual can access instances of a product. It allows an unlimited number of users per device. A single Device license can support multiple users from the same device.

Note: These licenses are only device licenses and are not the same as user/device licenses.
  • A classroom workstation, used by many students.
  • A clinical workstation in a hospital, used by hospital staff.

When a single device is used by multiple users, a device license is consumed for the 90 day assignment period. The license assignment period begins when a connection is made. The device lease for the license assignment will expire in 90 days after the last connected user or device disconnects.

  • Per socket license

Per socket licenses are consumed based on the number of CPU sockets. Cores are not counted. For example:

  • If a computer with two CPU sockets has only one CPU then only one license is consumed.
  • If a computer with two sockets has two CPUs, each with a quad core, then two licenses are used.

Citrix Hypervisor uses per socket licenses.

  • Named user license (legacy)

In a product when you request a license, a named user license is checked out until a preconfigured period expires. This type of license check-out is not tied to a computer or a device. After the license is checked out, the user can run multiple sessions on different computers without checking out more licenses.

  • Evaluation licenses

Citrix aims to provide the best customer experience possible, many of Citrix’s products offer a demo experience. You can set up this demo experience directly through citrix.com or by contacting Citrix sales team. These demos allow for a customized experience to fit your needs, use cases and active projects; get real-time answers and advice from a Citrix expert.

IMPORTANT: The allotment is one evaluation license per product, per account, per year.

See How to obtain a Citrix Evaluation license using My Account for more information.

  • License overdraft

On-premises products that support user/device , user , or device license models include a license overdraft feature. This feature enables you to use an additional 10% of extra licenses beyond the purchased quantity to prevent access denial. The license overdraft count is displayed in a separate column within the License Administration Console. The installed column displays both the purchased license total plus the associated overdraft total. Overdraft usage is also visible in Studio.

The license overdraft feature is offered as a convenience, not as a license entitlement. Any overdraft licenses used must be purchased within 30 days of first use.

Concurrent licenses and server licenses do not contain the overdraft feature. Citrix reserves the right to remove any overdraft features in new product releases.

  • Supplemental grace period

The supplemental grace period enables unlimited connections to a product for 15 consecutive days. This feature is available to Citrix Virtual Apps and Desktops licenses. You can use this feature with a XenApp 7.6 or XenDesktop 7.6 version and above.

If all licenses are in use, including the license overdraft where applicable, the supplemental grace period gives you time to determine why you exceeded the maximum license count and to purchase more licenses without disrupting your users.

After the supplemental grace period expires, normal connection limits are enforced. Users are not disconnected during active sessions. As they disconnect, however, no new connections can occur until the license levels return to normal.

The supplemental grace period is not automatically re-enabled once it completes. To re-enable the supplemental grace period, you must install another retail license. This retail license grants a new 15-day supplemental grace period if and when you exceed the subsequent maximum installed license limit.

We recommend that you allow the supplemental grace period to run out after it starts. To clear the warning condition do not add licenses immediately. Doing so gives you time to fully assess the situation and correctly address any issues.

Note: If you install licenses while the supplemental grace period is in force, the License Server exits the supplemental grace period. Reenabling the supplemental grace period before fully determining the reason for the supplemental grace period, and how many licenses you require, might cause you to reenter the period after installing new licenses.

Supplemental grace periods are granted per product version and edition and only for retail licenses . The supplemental grace period is enabled by default when you first install the license. To disable the supplemental grace period feature, use the Citrix Licensing Manager .

There is no way to track the total number of licenses consumed while in the supplemental grace period. You can use lmstat udadmin and connection information from the product to determine how many more licenses are required.

Note: The grace period and supplemental grace period are two different features. The grace period and supplemental grace period features do not apply when licenses expire. For more information about grace periods, see Grace period .

Citrix Virtual Apps and Desktops Director displays the grace period states. For more information, see Panels on the Director Dashboard .

The supplemental grace period feature is offered as a convenience, not as a license entitlement. Citrix reserves the right to remove any such feature in new product releases.

Overdraft and Supplemental grace period examples

Example 1: Citrix Virtual Apps and Desktops user/device, user, or device licenses using the overdraft and supplemental grace period features

Overdraft and Supplemental grace period

You initially purchase and install 1000 licenses from Citrix (I) which includes a 10% license overdraft allowance (OD). When licenses are allocated, you have 1100 licenses in total. At the time it is sufficient for the number of users connecting.

d0 At a later date (day 0) you are using 1050 licenses. When the 1001st license was used, the overdraft feature was activated. Your users can continue to connect without any disruption of service. You start evaluating your licensing needs now. Do not wait until you exceed the OD. Think about buying more licenses in addition to the 1000 you bought initially.

d10 10 days later (day 10) more users connect and 1150 licenses are being used, which exceeds the 1100 total licenses you have available (!). When the 1101st license was used, the 15 day supplemental grace period (SPG) started, to allow you time to evaluate your license needs. Your users can continue to connect without any disruption of service.

d25 15 days later after d10 (day 25) the supplemental grace period runs out because you chose not to purchase and install more licenses. Users cannot make new connections if doing so requires more than 1100 licenses to be checked out. You cannot re-enable the supplemental grace period until you purchase and install more licenses.

Example 2: Citrix Virtual Apps and Desktops concurrent licenses using supplemental grace period feature

Supplemental Grace Period

You initially purchase and install 1000 concurrent licenses (I). There is no overdraft allowance with concurrent licenses. At the time these licenses are sufficient for the number of users connecting.

d0 At a later date (day 0) you are using 1050 licenses. When the 1001st license was used, the 15 day supplemental grace period (SPG) started, to allow you time to evaluate your license needs. Your users can continue to connect without any disruption of service. You start evaluating your licensing needs now. Do not wait until the supplemental grace period runs out. Think about buying more licenses in addition to the 1000 you bought initially.

d15 15 days later (day 15) the supplemental grace period runs out because you chose not to purchase and install more licenses. Users cannot make new connections if doing so requires more than 1000 licenses to be checked out. You cannot re-enable the supplemental grace period until you purchase and install more licenses.

  • Overdraft and supplemental grace period availability

The following table lists the support for license overdraft and supplemental grace period for each product. For more information, see Products and license models .

  • Citrix on-premises subscription for annual and term-based retail licenses

On-premises subscription licensing allows customers to host a Citrix environment within their infrastructure for a set period. The on-premises subscription license is time-bound for 1-5 years and expires on a specific date. The license ceases to operate following the expiration date. The products offer everything that is available today with perpetual licenses.

Your purchase includes both an on-premises subscription license and Customer Success Services Select service. Customer Success Select service is included for the entire term of the subscription.

Note: Mixing permanent (perpetual) and subscription licenses is supported. They can be used to expand existing environments provided customers use the same product, edition, and license model. There are no performance impacts to using perpetual vs. subscription licenses. The only difference between them is one expires.

Before license expiration

For products that are automatically renewed each month, Citrix does not send notifications before expiration.

For products that are not automatically renewed, Citrix notifies you at certain intervals when your existing subscription approaches expiration. These notifications alert you to extend the subscription and avoid service interruption.

All on-premises subscription, annual and other term-based retail licenses include an additional 30 days built into the expiration date for continued access. These additional 30 days are included in the expiration date shown in the Citrix Licensing Manager. You can use these 30 days to repurchase subscription licenses, allocate, and install before the original subscription license expires. If you do not renew, the product gets into an unlicensed state with limited capabilities.

Example: If you purchased a one year on-premises subscription license on 21 Oct 2020, your license will expire at 12:01 on 22 Nov 2021.

When your on-premises subscription expires, as per the date listed in the Citrix Licensing Manager, no new connections are allowed. Existing users are not impacted, however, if users log off or disconnect they are not allowed to reconnect.

Extend on-premises subscription licenses

The Citrix Auto-Renewal program is the default renewal program for all on-premises subscription licenses. On-premises subscription licenses are enrolled in the Auto-Renewal program. To learn more about the Auto-Renewal Program visit https://www.citrix.com/buy/licensing/citrix-cloud-services-renewals.html .

To extend your on-premises license subscription, visit https://www.citrix.com/buy/ .

Note: Licenses with a future start date are not displayed in the License Server inventory until the actual start date mentioned in the license file.

Will on-premises subscription licenses work with existing perpetual licenses on the same server?

Yes, within the guidelines of existing license server operation. Customers must add a new term license file to the license server.

Term or subscription licensing does not have a negative impact on delivering the on-premises subscription licenses to a customer’s existing environment, provided the product version (Virtual Apps / Virtual Apps and Desktops), edition (Standard, Advanced, Premium), and type (User/Device, Concurrent) are the same. For example:

Virtual Apps and Desktops Premium Concurrent perpetual + Virtual Apps and Desktops Premium Concurrent term have no issues.

Virtual Apps and Desktops Premium Concurrent perpetual + Virtual Apps and Desktops Premium User/Device term. This license combination is non-standard and requires consideration and more configuration . This combination might not be optimal for license utilization.

Virtual Apps and Desktops Premium Concurrent perpetual + Virtual Apps and Desktops Advanced User/Device term. This license combination is non-standard and not advisable. Requires customer to have multiple sites or farms to use all purchased licenses.

Will the XenApp farm, Citrix Virtual Apps, Citrix Virtual Apps & Desktops stop accepting connections?

Yes. No new connections are allowed after the license expires. Existing connections are not impacted until users disconnect, logoff, or reset.

Will there be a supplemental grace period (SGP) of 15 days or does that only apply to perpetual licenses?

No. There is no grace period for license expiration. An extra month is added into the expiration date for customers to install repurchased licenses.

In this article

This Preview product documentation is Citrix Confidential.

You agree to hold this documentation confidential pursuant to the terms of your Citrix Beta/Tech Preview Agreement.

The development, release and timing of any features or functionality described in the Preview documentation remains at our sole discretion and are subject to change without notice or consultation.

The documentation is for informational purposes only and is not a commitment, promise or legal obligation to deliver any material, code or functionality and should not be relied upon in making Citrix product purchase decisions.

If you do not agree, select I DO NOT AGREE to exit.

Do you want to switch to the website in your browser preferred language?

Edit Article

IMAGES

  1. Website Evaluation Report Template

    website evaluation assignment

  2. PPT

    website evaluation assignment

  3. Final Reports

    website evaluation assignment

  4. A Website Evaluation Checklist

    website evaluation assignment

  5. 🌈 Sample website evaluation essay. Example Of Website Evaluation Essay

    website evaluation assignment

  6. Website Evaluation Assignment Individual.docx

    website evaluation assignment

VIDEO

  1. Form Research to Insight ShortClass

  2. Tut8-Matthew 5

  3. Using Online Assignments (Webinar)

  4. ENG 101 Unit 3 Source Evaluation Assignment

  5. EID 680: Module 2 Assignment Review

  6. Final Project: Evaluating Web 2.0 Tools

COMMENTS

  1. PDF FIT 100 Assignment 2: Evaluating Web Sites

    Objectives: • In a search engine, use basic search strategies to bring back sites with information on a topic. • Use evaluation techniques to determine authenticity and credibility of web sites. Online Resources: Web search tips from Search Engine Watch: http://www.searchenginewatch.com/facts/index.html List of Search Engines by function:

  2. How To Evaluate Websites: A Guide For Teachers And Students

    How To Evaluate A Website 1) Open the site. The first thing students need to do is open the site. When looking through your Google search results, you may want to teach students to open sites in new tabs, leaving their search results in a tab for easy access later (e.g. right-click on the title and click "Open link in new tab").. It can also be worthwhile to explain the anatomy of a Google ...

  3. PDF Teaching Website Evaluation: The CRAAP Test and the Evolution of an

    The assignment was created using Google Forms and was easy to access for both librarians and students. Up through spring 2014, the format of the class was as follows: Part I: Finding a book using the catalog Part II: Finding an article using one of the databases Part III: Website evaluation

  4. Website Evaluation Worksheet

    Overview This is a worksheet that helps students consider the websites that they are viewing. Students learn to: Evaluate websites using the following criteria Authority Purpose Coverage Accuracy Objectivity Currency Appearance Compare websites for accuracy and value Website Evaluation Worksheet Website Evaluation

  5. Evaluating Websites: Criteria and Exercises

    Before you use a website as a resource, evaluate it with the five CAPPS Criteria:. C urrency: Publication date or updated date. The age of the content. Authority: What qualifies the content creator or author to produce information about the topic?; Publisher / Publication: What is the reputation of the publisher, publication, or organization hosting the content?

  6. How to Research: Evaluating Websites

    When evaluating websites or any other information sources, use the following CRAAP test to help evaluate the information you find. This checklist applies to any resource you may use for a school assignment, but keep in mind that some items are specific to websites. Download a CRAAP t est worksheet. Currency: The timeliness of the information.

  7. Evaluating Information

    Look at the 5 points in the S.T.A.A.R. evaluation method to see how it stacks up. Give the website your own personal rating. The S.T.A.A.R. evaluation method was created by Laura Karas and the Librarians at the University of South Carolina Upstate based on both the A.B.C. and the C.R.A.A.P. methods of evaluating websites. S = Slant. T = Topical

  8. Website Analysis 101: Tools, SEO, Checklist, and Examples

    Website analysis is the practice of analyzing, then testing and optimizing, a website's performance. Any site can benefit from some form of website analysis if the results are then used to improve it—for example, by reducing page size to increase overall loading speed or optimizing a landing page with lots of traffic for more conversions.

  9. Website Evaluation

    When evaluating websites or any other information sources, use the following CRAAP test to help evaluate the information you find. This checklist applies to any resource you may use for a school assignment, but keep in mind that some items are specific to websites. Currency: The timeliness of the information.

  10. Online Research: Evaluating Example Websites

    To practice evaluating websites you find, let's apply what we've learned so far to two examples! Apply the CRAAP Test! This site is a fairly obvious joke - octopi are sea animals and do not live in trees (in the Pacific Northwest or elsewhere).

  11. Website Evaluation Assignment Culminating Project Website Evaluation

    1 This assignment is the first step in your Culminating Project. (See each instructor's culminating assignment for a full description of the final project.) For the Website Evaluation Assignment, working as an individual, you will locate two websites that you think will provide helpful information on the women's issue with which you plan to work.

  12. Criteria for Website Evaluation

    Criteria for Website Evaluation - Evaluating Websites & Internet Sources - Research Guides at Skagit Valley College Evaluating Websites & Internet Sources com - commercial business (the most common TLD) org - organizations (typically, nonprofit) gov - government agencies. edu - educational institutions. net - network organizations. mil - military

  13. WebD2: Developing a Website Evaluation Tool

    Overview The purpose of this assignment is to challenge, test and ultimately come to general agreement on evaluation criteria for websites. This exercise is student driven, but don't be surprised if your teacher offers some guidance along the way. Learner Outcomes At the completion of this exercise:

  14. Project Assignment 2

    Evaluation Assignment 1 - Website and Stakeholders, Goals and Task Analysis; Evaluation Assignment 2 - Heuristic Evaluation; Evaluation Assignment 3 - Usability Test Schedule; ... The links should be clear and well organized, so that users of your web site will easily recognize them. You should also review the graduate students' user ...

  15. Evaluation Assignment 1

    Evaluation Assignment 1 - Website and Stakeholders, Goals and Task Analysis Website Design and implement a website for your topic and evaluation documents. Recall that a website is a domain of HCI and your site will be evaluated accordingly. The website does not need to be elaborate, but it should serve the purpose of the users of your website.

  16. PDF Website Evaluation Rubric

    Website Evaluation Rubric CATEGORY 4 3 2 1 Content The site has a well-stated clear purpose and theme that is carried out throughout the site. The site has a clearly ... the assignment have been met. Almost all the information provided by the student on the Web site is accurate and all requirements of the assignment have

  17. WRT 101

    Click on the "Evaluating Websites" tab for strategies to help you evaluate websites. The CRAAP Test: Guidelines for Evaluating Websites When evaluating websites or any other information sources, use the following CRAAP test to help evaluate the information you find.

  18. Website Evaluation Exercise

    For an alternative classroom-based assignment, faculty can select 5-10 websites at random for students to evaluate. Health Summit Working Group's policy paper, Criteria for Assessing the Quality of Health Information on the Internet http://hitiweb.mitretek.org/docs/policy.html#top (accessed 3/18/2006)

  19. EVALUATING INTERNET SOURCES

    The World Wide Web can be a great place for information on many topics. However, it is important to remember that anyone can put information on the Web—it is unregulated, unmonitored, unchecked, unedited, and of widely differing reliability.Take for example, Wikipedia, known on the Internet as "the free encyclopedia that anyone can edit."The site's general disclaimer states that the site has ...

  20. Website Evaluation Assignment Example

    5 Checklists A website's content is what makes it known to the general public. The good is the content; the more is the website's rating. Still, many websites upload content that they are not authorised to do. Thus, the readers must be able to evaluate the website based on some website evaluation assignment criteria.

  21. LIS 201

    LIS 201 - Activity - Database Searching (required) LIS- Chapter 1. Chapter 4-textbook activity. Chapter 5 textbook activity. Chapter 6 textbook activity- LIS. Statistical Abstract. Relevance The site is very relevant and is well written so a general audience can read it and understand the information with no problem.

  22. Website Evaluation Assignment by on Prezi Next

    At first glance, the title of the website hosting the article, Improbable Research, does not create a sense of trustworthiness with the information on the website. After diving deeper into the website, there were more interesting items to evaluate. There was never a stated purpose on the website. From the study, there was a general ...

  23. Website Evaluation assignment.docx

    Chamberlain College of Nursing NR-351: Transitions in Professional Nursing Website Evaluation Template Student Name: Date: February 16, 2014 Directions: 1. Carefully read the Website Evaluation Guidelines found in Doc Sharing. This provides specific details on how to complete this assignment. 2. Rename this document by clicking "Save As." Change the file name so it reads Your Last Name ...

  24. License types

    The license assignment period begins when a connection is established. The period is renewed to a full 90 days during the life of the connection. The user/device lease for the license assignment will expire in 90 days after the last connected user or device disconnects. ... Evaluation licenses. Citrix aims to provide the best customer ...