This website works best with JavaScript switched on. Please enable JavaScript

  • Centre Services
  • Associate Extranet
  • All About Maths

GCSE Art and Design

8201, 8202, 8203, 8204, 8205, 8206

  • Specification
  • Planning resources

Teaching resources

  • Assessment resources
  • Command words (1)
  • Community links (26)
  • Resource lists (1)
  • Schemes of work (6)
  • Subject specific vocabularies (1)
  • Teaching guides (1)

Showing 36 results

Scheme of work: Three-dimensional Design

Published 20 Sep 2023 | DOCX | 93 KB

Scheme of work: Photography

Published 20 Sep 2023 | DOCX | 94 KB

Scheme of work: Graphic communication

Published 20 Sep 2023 | DOCX | 102 KB

Scheme of work: Fine art

Published 20 Sep 2023 | DOCX | 449 KB

Scheme of work: Art, craft and design

Published 20 Sep 2023 | DOCX | 516 KB

Scheme of work: Textile design

Published 20 Sep 2023 | DOCX | 104 KB

Teaching guide

Published 19 Oct 2022 | PDF | 300 KB

Community link: Black Identities and Art - Tate [tate.org.uk]

Published 27 Jun 2022

Community link: Anti-Racist Art Education (ARAE) resources [nsead.org]

Community link: Black Lives Matter resources - National Museums Liverpool [liverpoolmuseums.org.uk]

Community link: Victoria and Albert museum - resources for teachers [vam.ac.uk]

Published 19 Oct 2016

Subject specific vocabulary

Published 27 Oct 2015

Command words

Published 26 May 2015

Resource list

Published 21 May 2015 | PDF | 234 KB

Community link: Impressions Gallery [impressions-gallery.com]

Published 19 Apr 2013

Community link: Design Museum [designmuseum.org]

Community link: AccessArt [accessart.org.uk]

Community link: Google Arts & Culture [artsandculture.google.com]

Community link: University of Westminster [westminster.ac.uk]

Community link: University of Leeds [leeds.ac.uk]

The Art Teacher

Art Lesson Ideas, Plans, Free Resources, Project Plans, and Schemes of Work. An 'outstanding' art teacher in Greater Manchester. Teaching KS3 and KS4 art and design.

GCSE Art Project – Skills Training

This GCSE Art Project is the first I teach when students start in Year 10 (KS4). Essentially, I wanted to develop and enhance the range of skills that students have been taught at KS3, enabling them to master and improve in a way that was engaging yet simple to achieve.

There are some ‘essential’ GCSE art skills taught in this project, including:

  • grid drawing method
  • pencil drawing
  • pen drawing
  • acrylic painting
  • watercolor painting
  • poly printing
  • different types of research / art analysis / presenting skills.

The full presentation for this GCSE Art Skills Training Project is available on TES or TPT .

GCSE Art Essential Skills - Pencil Drawing - Pop Culture

Get art lesson resources emailed straight to you:

Enter your email address

I introduced the Art Skills Training project by explaining that students would be building upon their skills by using new materials and working to a theme. Each year I change the theme depending on the cohort, and this year I had a really large class with a high number of boys, as well as targets ranging from grade 3 to grade 8… with all that in mind I chose the theme POP CULTURE .

GCSE Art Skills Project

Why Pop Culture ? I wanted a theme that was varied enough to engage a wide range of students, and something that could easily provide reference imagery for students to work from. I also wanted a theme that students could have some autonomy over in their research.

I started by sharing a range of Pop Culture-inspired artworks, then shared different ideas with students so they could start thinking about subjects they wanted to draw, paint etc. This helped them with their first research task – a moodboard.

Pop Culture GCSE Art Skill project

Examples of student’s GCSE Art Moodboard Research:

GCSE Art Moodboard - Pop Culture - Art project

After their moodboard, I explained how each of the art skills we were going through was an ‘essential’ to master – enabling them to be more confident and experimental later in the course. There are no ‘official’ essential art skills of course, I just wanted students to be really serious about upping their skills – it seemed to work! 🤷

Essential GCSE Art Skill 1: Grid Drawing

I have written about why I love the Grid Drawing Method in art before, so won’t get into that now, but I did have students use one of the pages from that resource over the summer holidays, before they started back in Year 10.

The aim was to get a low-stakes baseline assessment done without cutting into GCSE time. It proved useful as I could see the drawing standard students were at (and see how much – or little – effort they put into homework).

GCSE Art - grid drawing lessons

The project includes a range of lesson entry tasks / starter / plenary activities, as well as examples of student’s work to review and use. Each task was geared towards students improving their work.

Students chose three different subjects to draw, all from reference photographs that are also included in the presentation.

Essential GCSE Art Skill 2: Pencil Drawing & Shading

Next up on my little list of essentials is pencil drawing and shading . Of course, the outline drawing bit was mostly already done with the grids, but pencil shading is equally important (IMO). Students had done a lot of pencil work already, so this skill was about mastery – exaggerating light and dark, refining edges and lines, blending tones seamlessly etc.

For these lessons, I made sure students had a range of quality shading pencils to work with, as well as my much loved electric rubber – perfect for detailed highlights!

GCSE Art lollipop pencil drawing - skills training

This was probably the skill that my students were most confident with as we build pencil drawing skills throughout Key Stage 3. Since this was done right at the start of Year 10, I thought it was great to see students confidence improve as they added tone onto their initial grid drawings.

Essential GCSE Art Skill 3: Artist Research

It is really important that GCSE students understand why they need to create good quality artist research. Their research should reveal things to them as they work:

  • Context : Information about the artist’s life and work
  • Processes and techniques : how the artist created their work
  • Inspiration : How the students can use ideas or materials like the artist

Students should then have the confidence to respond, in their own way, to the research. Drawings, paintings, colour studies, sketches, photographs, replicas, written analyses are all valid responses to an artist’s work.

Since this was their first GCSE-standard artist research task, I set the artist to research. I chose biro pen artist Nicola McBride for her exceptional pen work related to Objects and Still Life, and because her work linked to their next ‘essential art skill’ – biro drawing.

Nicola McBride - Tunnocks Teacake Biro Pen drawing - Artist research GCSE skills

Students loved Nicola McBride’s biro pen drawings, particularly this hyper-realistic Tunnock’s Teacake!

Essential GCSE Art Skill 4: Biro Pen Drawing

Adding shading and tone with a biro pen can seem quite a strange concept to students, but once they had a bit of practice and got the hang of it, they produced some outstanding pieces!

For these lessons, I showed students how to add layers of pen in different directions in order to add darker tones gradually . I emphasised the importance of white highlights too.

GCSE art biro pen drawing - storm trooper

Essential GCSE Art Skill 5: Paint Mixing

We all have our own way of teaching colour mixing, but I wanted to focus on how students could achieve a full range of tints and shades in their work so the task was to create a monochromatic acrylic painting.

GCSE Art acrylic painting - darth vader - monochromatic

To mix, I always lay out around 5 blobs of white. I add colour to the first blob, then mix. I use this first light colour to mix into the second white blob. I repeat this until the last blob has the lightest colour fully mixed. 🤯

I loved this part of the project and was really proud of how hard students worked to create their painted pieces. Once they had mastered mixing tints and shades, the rest was fairly straight forward as they worked from their reference images. I made these little animations showing their steps 😊

Essential GCSE Art Skill 6: Responding to a Style of Art

Throughout their GCSE Art course, students should analyse and respond to different sources. As the theme for their work was Pop Culture, I chose Pop Art as a style to introduce.

The project introduces the main features of Pop Art, which students then had to use in their own artwork.

GCSE Skills Training Project - Pop Art Lessons

I set an online homework (through Google Classroom) for students to research Pop Art, they had to answer these questions in as much detail as possible, and include pictures as examples:

  • What is Pop Art?
  • Who are three famous Pop artists?
  • What are the features of Pop Art?
  • How would you describe Pop Art?
  • What is your opinion on the Pop Art style?

GCSE Research pages examples - Pop Art

Here are some student examples of their responses to Pop Art, they’re so fun. We used Posca Paint pens for fine details / dots and outlines (a great investment for our department!).

gcse art homework tasks

Essential GCSE Art Skill 7: Coloured Pencil

This is a fairly simple, but important, skill for GCSE. Coloured pencil can be used with other media, such as paints or layered over pen etc. so I wanted to ensure students had a few key skills.

Our budget in the department is limited, but we were kindly donated some packs of these superb Caran D’Ache coloured pencils and they are completely worth the price.

GCSE Art coloured pencil examples - spiderman

The presentation includes entry / exit tasks , all aimed at improving the quality of student’s work. This coloured pencil example was by one of my students too.

Essential GCSE Art Skill 8: Mixed Media

I wanted students to have the opportunity to combine wet and dry materials. Since we had already used acrylics, I chose watercolour and pen , with the aim of adding texture and mark-making to their work.

I love how sketchy and loose these pieces came out. Students used a range of biro, fineliner and white gel pens to add textures.

GCSE Art watercolour / pen drawing.

Essential GCSE Art Skill 9: Printing

This was the first time most of my students had done any form of printing (thanks Covid!) so I kept it quite simple, using polyboard rather than lino. Students had to create different ‘pop art’ backgrounds using tissue paper (inspired by their earlier research).

gcse art homework tasks

This could easily be done onto coloured paper or watercolour washes rather than tissue paper if you don’t have any. Here are some examples from my students – don’t they look great?!

GCSE Art Printing examples - Pop Art - Marmite

I taught this GCSE Art Skills Training Project from September to December, but of course if there are any skills you feel don’t need teaching, you can easily skip these from your own lessons. Generally, students were able to keep up with the pace of the project, but I made sure any students who fell behind completed their work before moving onto the next skill.

Here are some more examples of student’s artwork from the project – what do you think? Let me know in the comments!

gcse art homework tasks

Sharing is caring

Leave a comment cancel reply.

' src=

Published by art_teacher_mcr

Making and teaching art. Based in Manchester. View all posts by art_teacher_mcr

' src=

  • Already have a WordPress.com account? Log in now.
  • Subscribe Subscribed
  • Copy shortlink
  • Report this content
  • View post in Reader
  • Manage subscriptions
  • Collapse this bar

gcse art homework tasks

Pastel Inspire

We've moved -> pastelinspire.com.

gcse art homework tasks

5 Top-tips to survive the Art workload (from a GCSE A*/grade 9 student) [Pastel Inspire]

This website has been archived – please check out the same blog post (and many more!!) on my new website, pastelinspire.com!!

Currently many Year 9s and 10s are starting their GCSE Art coursework and the pressure is starting to mount, with large amounts of homework and stressful classwork. Generally GCSE Art is a real shock to the system and, by Christmas, a handful of students can feel overwhelmed by the amount of work and others fall behind very quickly.

If you Google “should I do GCSE art”, you’ll probably find a lot of students and mums saying how difficult GCSE Art was, as well as how impossible it is to keep on top on the workload, making it impossible to get a good grade…

Well, guess what–I took GCSE Art&Design from 2015-2017 and I was thrilled to obtain full marks in both my coursework and exam project! It was not an easy GCSE for me, but it was probably my most rewarding.

gcse art homework tasks

Note: I did the AQA Art GCSE course in 2016/17. I am basing this article on the AQA art courses (specifically the Art & Design course) but I have also read the specification for the new 9-1 course, so the information given and the skills I have learnt are 100% applicable for the exams taught from September 2016 (with exams starting in June 2018). This advice can also be transferred to other exam boards, although the Assessment Objective marking method that AQA uses (mentioned in my first point) may differ from that of other exam boards.

Every piece of advice (besides the first) can be applied to everyday artwork and any art lessons internationally–you don’t need to be living in England and doing your GCSEs to be able to “work homework around your schedule” or “cut some corners”; this goes for anyone struggling with art loads! In fact, it could even work for artists on social media who are trying to gain followers with frequent posting, but are stuggling to keep up with demand (we’ve all been there!).

It is a truth universally acknowledged that GCSE Art is a difficult GCSE. You have probably heard it a thousand times that the GCSE work load for all art courses is pretty huge. This is most definitely true; my art class was full of extremely talented artists who all were capable of getting that prestigious A* grade. However, talent is not everything and with so much to do in the course, it is very, very easy to fall behind.

Despite this warning, it would be a lie to say I did not love GCSE Art & Design and that the art lessons were not the highlight of my Year 10/11 timetable. These tips are all to make the GCSE Art courses (whether photography, art & design, fine art or something else) more manageable in workload, which I have learnt over the two-year period. I believe some of these tips (particularly the last one) significantly reduced my stress levels in art lessons

Less can be more (when it comes to marking) (specifically for AQA GCSE)

Honestly! For the AQA specification, there are four elements that are each marked out of 24 (old qualification: 20), leading to 96 marks (80): for each of your coursework projects and your final exam project (the final grade is 60% coursework and 40% exam). I will give a quick summary of each of the Assessment Objectives (AO) below (not in chronological order, but by what my teacher taught me as the most sensible order):

  • AO3: Researching artists, going to museums galleries to collect inspiration. This is all about showing you have been using other sources to develop your projects, often through “research pages” and artist studies.
  • AO2: Studies and practising actually creating art. If it’s still life, you’ll probably have some fruit plopped on the desk and told to draw them- it does help develop your skills when it comes to your final response or exam.
  • AO1: Bringing ideas together. This is basically developing what you have learnt in AO2 and AO3 to start coming up with some concepts and ideas in preparation for AO4.
  • AO4: Your personal response. This could be a “final piece” type artwork which mirrors the process of your exam project (which was how my school did this) but it could be another type of response. It is based on what you have learnt in AO2 and AO3.

This may seem off topic to the question of “less is more”, but when it comes to GCSE Art, as long as you have covered all four of these aspects in good enough quality, then you will not lose marks. Sometimes, teachers even discard some of your worse pieces for the marking process, so it doesn’t lower your grade. Of course, that isn’t a reason for slacking as your teacher will know how much you need to do at what standard for that A* (or whatever grade you are aiming for!).

This tip is more for reassurance than advice for something you should put into practice: just focus with the task at hand, and if there is one terrible Year 10 piece that you and your teacher both know did not show off the best of your ability, it will probably be removed with little fuss.

A good unfinished piece is better than a rushed finished piece

Similarly to the last tip, this is important considering just how much work you may have to do for your GCSE Art course. You may want to try and get every part of an artwork to the same degree of “finished-ness” and detail, but bare in mind that examiners just want to see you are capable of getting to that standard at all!

If you are running short on time for any art piece, just make sure one area of it is finished, to show you are capable of reaching that A*-standard! You will not be marked down on that, although, again, that is not an excuse for slacking- your teacher is unlikely to appreciate every painting or sketchbook page being half finished (note that this does not apply for artist research pages or any other collage-type work you might do for AO3; those are meant to look full and busy, however you may be able to cut some shortcuts: see below).

gcse art homework tasks

Art homework doesn’t have to be a chore; work it around your schedule

This one is also very important; the number of people whom I’ve heard leave their homework for the lunchtime before the lesson is huge! I have sometimes been known to do this myself, I grant you, but I do find it brings me unnecessary stress (plus, I very rarely can manage to finish my art homework in 30 minutes!). A very easy way to fall behind on art homework can be simply to procrastinate, putting it off to the last minute and then forgetting about it. It is notoriously common!

So an easy way to prevent procrastinating with your art homework is to multi-task when you do it. I personally find that the best time for me to do my homework is when I would usually watch television in the evenings; a Saturday night Strictly Come Dancing session is the perfect excuse to spend two and a half hours doing a collage or working on a study of an apple! Other times you could do your art homework could be during the school journey from home or on the way back home, during lunchtimes (though best not to do it the lunchtime before the lesson- try to spread it out throughout two or three as you’ll probably need the extra time!) or whenever you have a break in the day.

gcse art homework tasks

I don’t believe art homework shouldn’t be enjoyable; it should be fun, like a hobby. What is great about art is also that you can be social while you do it; I used to go to the art room every luinchtimes before a lesson so that I could chat with my artsy classmates while we all did some homework- it was a really nice way to spend my breaks in the school day!

What you reap now, you sow later

This is the most valuable piece of advice I could possibly give. I can not express how important time management is in art; if you can’t get your work done in the allocated amount of time, the unfinished work quickly builds up. This tip is what gave me five hours-worth of free periods at the end of Year 11, after I had finished my exam, while my classmates were finishing off coursework pieces. These free periods were very valuable for revision purposes so that I could now focus on subjects I stuggled with, putting Art behind me.

Put in the time. Work hard to make A* pieces at the weekends, in the evenings while watching television, because they will be valuable at the end of the two years. My favourite sketchbook page to this day is a photo collage I made which took me 10 hours to complete while watching TV one evening; it looks like it took an hour maximum you definitely can’t tell it took 10 hours when you look at it, but every photo, every stroke, was considering and placed carefully until I could declare it perfect. It is those sort of days that differentiated the A-grade pupils from the A* pupils: that clear passion and determination and pride in your artwork- and you don’t have to spend 10 hours on a piece just to prove that. Working hard at the start of Year 10 helps lower the inevitable stress (and workload) in the Year 11 exam season and that is precious; you really do not want to sacrifice revision and work in other subjects just to finish your art exam coursework.

gcse art homework tasks

  • Already have a WordPress.com account? Log in now.
  • Subscribe Subscribed
  • Copy shortlink
  • Report this content
  • View post in Reader
  • Manage subscriptions
  • Collapse this bar

5 Top-tips to survive the Art workload

From a GCSE A*/grade 9 student

Jennifer Leigh | 22nd December 2017

If you Google “should I do GCSE art”, you’ll probably find a lot of students and mums saying how difficult GCSE Art was, as well as how impossible it is to keep on top on the workload, making it impossible to get a good grade…

Well, guess what–I took GCSE Art&Design from 2015-2017 and I was thrilled to obtain full marks in both my coursework and exam project! It was not an easy GCSE for me, but it was probably my most rewarding.

Note: I did the AQA Art GCSE course in 2016/17. I am basing this article on the AQA art courses (specifically the Art & Design course) but I have also read the specification for the new 9-1 course, so the information given and the skills I have learnt are 100% applicable for the exams taught from September 2016 (with exams starting in June 2018). This advice can also be transferred to other exam boards, although the Assessment Objective marking method that AQA uses (mentioned in my first point) may differ from that of other exam boards.

gcse art homework tasks

Every piece of advice (besides the first) can be applied to everyday artwork and any art lessons internationally–you don’t need to be living in England and doing your GCSEs to be able to “work homework around your schedule” or “cut some corners”; this goes for anyone struggling with art loads! In fact, it could even work for artists on social media who are trying to gain followers with frequent posting, but are stuggling to keep up with demand (we’ve all been there!).

It is a truth universally acknowledged that GCSE Art is a difficult GCSE. You have probably heard it a thousand times that the GCSE work load for all art courses is pretty huge. This is most definitely true; my art class was full of extremely talented artists who all were capable of getting that prestigious A* grade. However, talent is not everything and with so much to do in the course, it is very, very easy to fall behind.

Despite this warning, it would be a lie to say I did not love GCSE Art & Design and that the art lessons were not the highlight of my Year 10/11 timetable. These tips are all to make the GCSE Art courses (whether photography, art & design, fine art or something else) more manageable in workload, which I have learnt over the two-year period. I believe some of these tips (particularly the last one) significantly reduced my stress levels in art lessons

Less can be more (when it comes to marking)

For the AQA specification, there are four elements that are each marked out of 24 (old qualification: 20), leading to 96 marks (80): for each of your coursework projects and your final exam project (the final grade is 60% coursework and 40% exam). I will give a quick summary of each of the Assessment Objectives (AO) below (not in chronological order, but by what my teacher taught me as the most sensible order):

  • AO3 Researching artists, going to museums galleries to collect inspiration. This is all about showing you have been using other sources to develop your projects, often through “research pages” and artist studies.
  • AO2 Studies and practising actually creating art. If it’s still life, you’ll probably have some fruit plopped on the desk and told to draw them- it does help develop your skills when it comes to your final response or exam.
  • AO1 Bringing ideas together. This is basically developing what you have learnt in AO2 and AO3 to start coming up with some concepts and ideas in preparation for AO4.
  • AO4 Your personal response. This could be a “final piece” type artwork which mirrors the process of your exam project (which was how my school did this) but it could be another type of response. It is based on what you have learnt in AO2 and AO3.

This may seem off topic to the question of “less is more”, but when it comes to GCSE Art, as long as you have covered all four of these aspects in good enough quality, then you will not lose marks. Sometimes, teachers even discard some of your worse pieces for the marking process, so it doesn’t lower your grade. Of course, that isn’t a reason for slacking as your teacher will know how much you need to do at what standard for that A* (or whatever grade you are aiming for!).

This tip is more for reassurance than advice for something you should put into practice: just focus with the task at hand, and if there is one terrible Year 10 piece that you and your teacher both know did not show off the best of your ability, it will probably be removed with little fuss.

A good unfinished piece is better than a rushed finished piece

Similarly to the last tip, this is important considering just how much work you may have to do for your GCSE Art course. You may want to try and get every part of an artwork to the same degree of “finished-ness” and detail, but bare in mind that examiners just want to see you are capable of getting to that standard at all!

If you are running short on time for any art piece, just make sure one area of it is finished, to show you are capable of reaching that A*-standard! You will not be marked down on that, although, again, that is not an excuse for slacking- your teacher is unlikely to appreciate every painting or sketchbook page being half finished (note that this does not apply for artist research pages or any other collage-type work you might do for AO3; those are meant to look full and busy, however you may be able to cut some shortcuts: see below).

gcse art homework tasks

This was not a piece for my GCSE coursework, but I decided to include it all the same (it is called “Moonlight”; if you’re interested in finding out my process in creating this little fox, check out my article here, where I also discuss my advice for overcoming a “slump”, also known as “I-don’t-know-how-to-fix-this syndrome”) as it demonstrates my point pretty well!

This piece was taking forever to paint and add the detail I wanted, so I ended up focusing completely on the face and head area. As you can see, this did not really affect how “finished” the artwork looked; in fact, the eye focuses on areas of more detail, making it so much more effective. You can see, if you take a second look at this painting, that everything from the neck downwards is actually little past the “base-layer” stage. Obviously, if I had longer (as in, about five more hours!), I could have added all the white highlights to the whole piece but, had this been a piece of GCSE coursework, it would have shown the examiner that I am capable getting a great amount of detail, as I got with the face, had I had enough time.

Now by shortcuts, I don’t mean getting someone to do your work for you, or printing out a sheet of photos just to stick it straight into your sketchbook! No, I mean using different media to add details quicker to get that grade A piece to an A* in 20 minutes, or to save those photos slightly bigger just to fill out more space, more quickly. This is similar to the point above in that you may not finish you artwork how you wanted to, if only to save time, yet this is really not he end of the world, especially if it is only an AO2 piece.

Here are some tips for quickly finishing art pieces, and also finishing research pages:

  • Ballpoint pens (are your best friend when it comes to quickly finishing pieces; from quick artist studies on a research page to finishing off that watercolour study that has been taking forever, adding details and shading with pens can save bucket-loads of time, as I learnt in my 10 hour exam!
  • White gel pens are honestly such a lifesaver! I highly recommend this for any GCSE artist or indeed any school art department (I believe I currently own 6 white gel pens in various places around my house!) as it is as precise as a ballpoint pen, less messy than Tip-ex/white-out/liquid-paper and so, so effective! You can add quick highlights onto any medium in a similar way to ballpoint pens for shading.
  • Paint is quicker than pencil and I know! we are all so used to coloured pencils and watercolours seem horribly difficult to control- but I promise you, just dash some watercolour onto a study and add all the shading with ballpoint pens and white gel pens once it is dry. I swear pencil work can take hours compared to a 20 minute watercolour wash; it’s not worth it!
  • Large photos in collages are easy and fill up space- often they also look best overlapping in a random manner rather than being arranged in neat rows
  • Add some sort of background , again, to fill up space. This can be as simple as a watercolour wash or a collage of papers (e.g. Book pages, a selection of colour sugar paper), which makes the page look a little less empty and brings out the real “collage’ look
  • Have some bits and pieces such as stamps or typed-out information to– you guessed it- fill out space. This helps bring everything together and means less work or studies to do on the page!

gcse art homework tasks

Art homework doesn’t have to be a chore; work it around your schedule

This one is also very important; the number of people whom I’ve heard leave their homework for the lunchtime before the lesson is huge! I have sometimes been known to do this myself, I grant you, but I do find it brings me unnecessary stress (plus, I very rarely can manage to finish my art homework in 30 minutes!). A very easy way to fall behind on art homework can be simply to procrastinate, putting it off to the last minute and then forgetting about it. It is notoriously common!

So an easy way to prevent procrastinating with your art homework is to multi-task when you do it. I personally find that the best time for me to do my homework is when I would usually watch television in the evenings; a Saturday night 'Strictly Come Dancing' session is the perfect excuse to spend two and a half hours doing a collage or working on a study of an apple! Other times you could do your art homework could be during the school journey from home or on the way back home, during lunchtimes (though best not to do it the lunchtime before the lesson- try to spread it out throughout two or three as you’ll probably need the extra time!) or whenever you have a break in the day.

gcse art homework tasks

I don’t believe art homework shouldn’t be enjoyable; it should be fun, like a hobby. What is great about art is also that you can be social while you do it; I used to go to the art room every luinchtimes before a lesson so that I could chat with my artsy classmates while we all did some homework- it was a really nice way to spend my breaks in the school day!

What you reap now, you sow later

This is the most valuable piece of advice I could possibly give. I can not express how important time management is in art; if you can’t get your work done in the allocated amount of time, the unfinished work quickly builds up. This tip is what gave me five hours-worth of free periods at the end of Year 11, after I had finished my exam, while my classmates were finishing off coursework pieces. These free periods were very valuable for revision purposes so that I could now focus on subjects I stuggled with, putting Art behind me.

Put in the time. Work hard to make A* pieces at the weekends, in the evenings while watching television, because they will be valuable at the end of the two years. My favourite sketchbook page to this day is a photo collage I made which took me 10 hours to complete while watching TV one evening; you definitely can’t tell it took 10 hours when you look at it, but every photo, every stroke, was considering and placed carefully until I could declare it perfect. It is those sort of days that differentiated the A-grade pupils from the A* pupils: that clear passion and determination and pride in your artwork- and you don’t have to spend 10 hours on a piece just to prove that. Working hard at the start of Year 10 helps lower the inevitable stress (and workload) in the Year 11 exam season and that is precious; you really do not want to sacrifice revision and work in other subjects just to finish your art exam coursework.

gcse art homework tasks

I really hope these tips have been helpful and wish the best of luck to anyone doing GCSE Art next year, or hoping to in the future. It is possibly the most rewarding GCSE, in my opinion, if you are able to work hard and focus on the task at hand. Swapping my GCSE options to do Art in favour of Latin was quite possibly one of the best decisions I’ve ever made; those two years improved my art more than I could have ever imagined, as well as the experience itself just teaching me so many things!

Those who say art is an easy A* have probably never actually been through it, but it’s a great journey; just try to enjoy it!

© 2020 Jennifer Leigh. Based on website design GreatSEO .

  • Vladimir Nemukhin
  • Lydia Masterkova
  • Lev Kropivnitsky
  • Yuri Zlotnikov
  • Francisco Infante-Arana
  • Turetskiy Boris
  • Nusberg Lev
  • Oleg Tselkov
  • Oskar Rabin
  • Mikhail Roginsky
  • Yevgeny Rukhin
  • Eric Bulatov
  • Oleg Vassiliev
  • Dmitry Plavinsky
  • Dmitri Krasnopevtsev
  • Vladimir Veisberg
  • Eduard Shteinberg
  • Mikhail Shvartsman
  • Ilya Kabakov

Marc Chagall and Jewish Theater, Part Two

by Jeanne Willette | Nov 18, 2016 | Modern , Modern Art

Marc Chagall in Moscow

The murals for the jewish theater, part two.

Perhaps because he was the first to visually imagine a totally Yiddish world, mystical and magical, sophisticated and folkish, avant-garde and traditional, Marc Chagall’s ability to capture the modernity of a new Jewish identity left a mark on Yiddish theater in Moscow. The Moscow State Yiddish Theatre ( Moskver idisher melukhisher teater ) also known as GOSET became a staging ground for the incorporation of Yiddish culture into mainstream Russian society. Chagall was “present at the creation,” as it were and his unique and distinctive vocabulary and his iconic imagery made a powerful impression upon both artists who had to follow in his wake and upon delighted audiences. Abram Efros, the art critic, wrote in 1922 of the extraordinary experience of viewing the collaboration between Alexi Granovsky and Marc Chagall,

Oh, that Yiddish theater!–without a foundation or a roof, without borers to its domain or any blueprint! A theater that is its own grandfather, father and son. A theater that has not yet any past, present, of future, and that must create for itself a past, a present, and a future. A theater that has to live simultaneously in three dimensions of time. A theater with no tradition, but which has to invent for itself a historical time line; a theater without a present, but which has to be at the cutting edge of contemporary theater art; a theater without perspective, but which has to old the form of what is to come.

A sponsor and supporter of Marc Chagall, Efros was one of the first to write of the excitement of presenting Yiddish culture after the new Soviet Union, under Lenin withdrew from the Great War. Suddenly all restrictions on Jewish movement and upon Jewish cultural expressions were withdrawn and opportunities presented themselves to artists like Chagall who now had the possibility of creating the foundational visuals of Yiddish culture. The artist, fresh from his humiliation in Vitebsk, rallied and produced a series of murals, which turned a confiscated home into an enveloping work of art, a backdrop against which the beloved stories of Sholom-Aleihem were performed. Efros noted that the State Yiddish Chamber Theater both benefited and paid for the success of Chagall, who proved to be a hard act to follow. The critic wrote that the artist “did not..accept any directions..” and that Chagall “forced us to pay the most expensive price for the Jewish national form of scenic expression..in the end, the young Yiddish theater struggled because of this victory.” In 2009,  Mel Gordon , professor of theater arts at Berkeley, noted that the Moscow Yiddish State Theater was the most successful theater of its time, even though the majority of the audiences did not understand Yiddish. Gordon pointed out that although Chagall mounted only one production in 1921 at the GOSET, he marked the theater with   “Chagallism,” the “touch that utterly changed” the theater group and “created a new art form.”

Gordon revealed that Granovsky–a child of a wealthy family–did not speak Yiddish, which was “lower class” or vernacular, and had no interest in Yiddish culture, but he found himself in Russia after the Revolution, a nation that no longer spoke the enemy language of German. Nevertheless the director wrote of the new theater in a brochure:  “Yiddish theater is first of all a theater in general, a temple of shining art and joyous creation — a temple where the prayer is chanted in the Yiddish language.”  Many Jews who came to Moscow were Russian speakers but were eager to support their own culture and didn’t seem to mind if they couldn’t understand Yiddish. This simple fact encouraged Granovsky to create the kind of theater that depended upon visuals rather than upon dialogue, making of the Yiddish theater a optical spectacle that allowed the viewers to follow the stories thought gestures and postures which provided plot and action without words. The best way to explain this new form of acting, or “spots,” is to compare the plays to the fragmentation of Analytic Cubism.

Sadly, Granovsky and Chagall were unable to see eye to eye. The conflict was unsurprising, given that Chagall had a deep understanding of Yiddish culture and Granovsky was expecting an “origin story” of Yiddish culture which existed on a higher plane. Chagall understood that Yiddish culture was a distinct folk culture, cut off from elite culture, and knew first hand that the Jewish culture was down to earth and even vulgar and obscene and offensive. In comparison to urban Jews throughout Europe, the Russian Jews, unless they were wealthy and privileged, were unassimilated and alienated. Therefore, it could be concluded that the Yiddish culture was “authentic” and unalloyed by outside influences. Chagall’s vision of ghetto and shtetl popular culture as evolved by a peasant culture of lower class people was seriously at odds with Granovsky, who had higher ambitions, derived from his apprenticeship with Max Reinhardt, and expected perhaps an idealized and sanitized rendition of what an outsider would have preferred “Yiddish” to be–not quite so alien and ungoverned.

As autobiographical as always, Chagall depicted himself and his family and the relatives who lived in Vitebsk and Lion and wrote the names of his numerous relatives into patterns on the trousers of a clown who played a flute. The frieze above the windows portrays a wedding, a highlight of Yiddish culture, a guarantee that the Jewish people  will continue as a unique group. The wedding was  a continuous feast, an endless celebration symbolized by food, paschal hala and New Year’s dishes. Below the entirety of a Jewish year, are a series of four personifications of Yiddish culture, set between the back windows. These narrow spaces were inhabited with the klezmer or the musician and the badchan or wedding jester and the svacha , a dancing woman, all of which appeared as allegories for creativity in the performing arts. The icon for Poetry was a sofier , or the scribe who copied the Torah in the peace of his private quarters.

marc-chagall-panel-from-the-yiddish-theatre-moscow-1920-3-foto-henning-hoholt

A “bodkin” at a Jewish Wedding also known as “Drama”

By using these apparently stock figures in Yiddish culture, Chagall, the son of the shtetl, introduced a defiant authenticity into the theater with his use of “bodkins” or Jewish comedians whose humor was vulgar and homophobic and did not invite laughter. In addition, Chagall insisted that, contrary to Russian expectations, Jewish literature did not emerge from religious documents, but from folk tales or “grandmother’s tales,” oral tradition, as recreated by Sholom-Aleihem. Because he was revered and accepted by both Russian and Yiddish speakers, Sholom-Aleihem, who made the choice to write in Yiddish, was a wise choice for the first event of GOSET. According to the 1993 Guggenheim exhibition of the murals,

Through a natural outgrowth of his painterly vocabulary, Chagall presented a kaleidoscopic panoply of ecstatic figures in this work, which suggested an anti-rational model of carnivalesque abandon for the theater. This conceptualization of theater was not entirely new; Russian directors such as Vsevolod Meierkhol’d and Aleksandr Tairov were exploring the legacy of commedia dell’arte and other popular theatrical spectacles before Chagall began work on the murals.” Granovskii was already disposed to that kind of dramatic treatment through his studies under Max Reinhardt, the progressive Austrian director. Yet Chagall presented a unique, and uniquely Jewish, approach. Through specifically Jewish visual puns, Yiddish inscriptions, and references to the festivities of Jewish weddings and Purim — a Jewish analogue to carnival in its emphasis on ludicrous masquerades and outrageous intoxication — he posited a distinctive model for the Jewish Theater.

Chagall & the artists of the Russian Jewish Theater

Marc Chagall. Introduction to Jewish Theater (1921)

In order to understand the “Chagall Box,” it is necessary to view the murals by the artists as both contrarian and as revelatory of a long hidden culture of lower class rural Jews. Appearing between the windows at the back of the theater as a rectangular “portrait,” the “bodkin,” according to Gordon, was a “sour” comedian who was featured at Jewish weddings with the task of overturning convention and even decency. The bodkin would make the bride and groom cry, if he was good at this job, that is, and he would direct his most cutting remarks to the wealthiest and most successor and most smug residents of the ghetto. In other words, the bodkin was a leveler and created a moment of the carnivalesque, when conventions were inverted. The  charivari was a Medieval European custom which was a subversive upending of the expected norms. To this day, in some parts of Europe a charivari will disturb the wedding night of a bride and groom. This counter culture, the antithesis to elite courtly behavior, was vividly depicted by Chagall on his twenty-five foot mural, Introduction to Jewish Theater , where he deliberately conflated Yiddish culture with Yiddish theater with its source of origin, the irreverent bodkin, to the often scatalogical and male culture of urinating and farting.

chagall8b

Detail of “Introduction to Jewish Theater”

The question is why did Chagall assert such a strong vision of Yiddish culture, unadorned and unadulterated, presented in a “popular manner” or folkstimlekh ? Why was he not more tactful and and cautious in his “Introduction?” The answer probably rests in the mood of the Jews in Russia after the Revolution. For the newly freed Jews, the insertion or absorption of Yiddish or Hebrew cultures of the “masses” into the fabric of Russian culture was part of the Revolution itself. In making Jewish life part of a pan-Russian society, intellectual and political Jews, like Marc Chagall, insisted on bringing society into a state of equality. Therefore, in Chagall’s murals, we can read an insistence of equivalency of high and low culture and a refusal to censor or subdue aspects of the shtetl. Indeed as Benjamin Harshav pointed out, the theater was guided by two leading principles: “theater as Art” and “theater of the State.” Therefore, the characters created by Sholom-Aleihem and Marc Chagall are tropes or character types, exaggerations of iconic figures well-know and well-honed over centuries, such as the hapless  schlemiel .

marc-chagall-the-fiddler-from-the-yiddish-theatre-moscow-1920-foto-henning-hoholt

“Music” as personified by the Green Fiddler and “Literature”

In the book,  Marc Chagall and His Times: A Documentary Narrative , by Benjamin Harshav and Barbara Harshav, it was pointed out that

The dense traditional culture of the Jewish religious world was now seen as folklore, a source of vitality, imagery, and folk wisdom that can be recycled into the modern, secular world, as Chagall tried to do in his murals for the Moscow Yiddish Theater. For a while, Chagall participated in this revival, he even restored his presumed original family name, and signed several paintings “Moyshe Segal.” The vast mural which “introduced” the origins of Jewish theater to the Moscow audience can be read from left to right–in Russian fashion–or from right to left—in Yiddish fashion, but in between is an antic display of dense imagery that needs to be read in terms of what the authors term “Jewish folk semiotics.” Quite different from the logic of Enlightenment thinking, this semiotic system reflects “a mind of associations that perceives events as situations and images parallel to one another in a global universe, rather than points in a causal chain, a narrative sequel with precise, rational chronologies. This traditional Jewish folk semiotics derives from the perception of post biblical Judaism, that after the destruction of the Jewish state and the close of the Bible, history was over; that their is a totality  of beliefs above all and any history and geography; that the Jews are a chosen and persecuted nation irrespective of the changing powers and politics, and nothing changes until the Messiah comes..Most traditional Jewish texts lack a narrative direction (except for the short stories embedded in them); that is, every detail is not a link in a chain of events, but is significant outside of its context, in a total universe of meaning. Hence it needs interpretation rather than counting. And this atemporal world perception and significance of every detail was internalized in Jewish folklore and behavior. Detail from “Introduction to Jewish Theater,” featuring Chagall on the far left being carried in by Abram Efros.

Chagall did not stay to savor his brief triumph in the theater and left Russia in 1922 and did not return until 1973. Discouraged at the state of the art world, he wrote, “Neither imperial Russia nor the Russia of the Soviets needs me. They don’t understand me. I am a stranger to them. I am certain Rembrandt loves me.”  Indeed Granovsky found that Chagall was trouble, “taking liberties,” and was unmanageable and was unable to comprehend the profound impact the murals would have upon theatrical production in Russia. Another designer, Nathan Altman was asked in 1922 to design sets and costumes for The Dybbuk , and Chagall was passed over. When he saw the performance, he felt that Altman had copied his conceptions from 1921 and translated them to a watered down version of his (postmodern avant la lettre ) view of the Jewish world. He wrote, “Those five years churn my soul. I have grown thin, I’m even hungry.” Thanks to Lunacharsky, his old friend, Chagall was given permission to leave the Soviet Union, ostensibly to deliver art works to Paris. He was forced to leave without his wife, Bella, and their only child, Ida, but they joined him later in 1922. In 1924 the murals were moved to a new site, a concert hall more suited for theatrical productions. During these years, avant-garde art and Jewish culture was gradually purged from the Soviet system by Stalin. Few of Chagall’s associates, friends or enemies colleagues survived the purges and censorship of the thirties and he alone of the Russian avant-garde left to paint in freedom in France.

art_sh_06_09

The Wedding Feast Frieze  (1920) 

Tempera, gouache and white highlights on canvas, 64 by 799 cm. State Trtyakov Gallery

Through a miracle, Chagall’s murals were preserved in situ until they were hidden away in 1937 by an admirer, Alexander Tyshler. In the post-Stalin era, Tyshler turned the murals over to the Tretyakov Gallery in August of 1952 where they remained for the next twenty years.  The artist had little hope that he would ever see the murals again and in fact, until 1973, this important body of work was unknown to the West. To Chagall’s joy, the seven murals, painted on the floor in goauche and tempera on canvas in forty days, had been removed from the walls and saved. The canvases were wrapped around drums which preserved the fragile painted surfaces. Chagall signed and dated the murals, interestingly enough in Russian, and from 1989 to 1990 they were restored at the Fondation Pierre Gianadda in Martigny, Switzerland and exhibited at the Guggenheim Museum in a landmark exhibition of 1992-1993.

If you have found this material useful, please give credit to

Dr. Jeanne S. M. Willette and  Art History Unstuffed.    

[email protected]

Recent Posts

  • Art Deco and Women
  • Le Corbusier: Purism as the Ideal City
  • Le Corbusier: The Pavillon de l’Esprit Nouveau
  • The Soviet Pavilion 1925
  • Constructivism and the Avant-Garde
  • International
  • Schools directory
  • Resources Jobs Schools directory News Search

GCSE Art - Artist Study Lesson

GCSE Art - Artist Study Lesson

Subject: Art and design

Age range: 14-16

Resource type: Lesson (complete)

ND_Art_Resources

Last updated

7 July 2022

  • Share through email
  • Share through twitter
  • Share through linkedin
  • Share through facebook
  • Share through pinterest

pdf, 75.04 MB

All GCSE Art projects must include artist studies. This gives students an idea of what is expected through visual examples by real students, as well as a clear set of graded outcome descriptors and success criteria checklist.

Free printable worksheet/ homework task on the last slide to give structure for written analysis.

Tes paid licence How can I reuse this?

Your rating is required to reflect your happiness.

It's good to leave some feedback.

Something went wrong, please try again later.

This resource hasn't been reviewed yet

To ensure quality for our reviews, only customers who have purchased this resource can review it

Report this resource to let us know if it violates our terms and conditions. Our customer service team will review your report and will be in touch.

Not quite what you were looking for? Search by keyword to find the right resource:

IMAGES

  1. A detailed drawing resource for A-level and GCSE Art: lots of different

    gcse art homework tasks

  2. GCSE Art Homework tasks

    gcse art homework tasks

  3. GCSE Art Outline homework- 1 page year 10

    gcse art homework tasks

  4. GCSE Art & Design Knowledge Organiser

    gcse art homework tasks

  5. A detailed drawing resource for A-level and GCSE Art: lots of different

    gcse art homework tasks

  6. A detailed drawing resource for A-level and GCSE Art: lots of different

    gcse art homework tasks

VIDEO

  1. GCSE Art Photography: Year 9 Options

  2. GCSE Art and Design

  3. One of the best websites in the world, This is Colossal

  4. A Level/ GCSE art sketchbook ideas! #shorts #alevelart

  5. Art homework done!! 😮‍💨😅

  6. Art Homework

COMMENTS

  1. PDF ART GCSE HANDBOOK

    PROJECT 1 WINDOWS AND DOORWAYS YR 10 DEC-JUNE PROJECT 2 PATTERN YR 10 JULY-YR 11 DEC EXAM (EXTERNALLY SET TASK) YR 11 JAN - APRIL HOMEWORK Homework will need to be completed weekly in order to complete the course successfully. We would expect 2 hours per week completed outside of lessons.

  2. PDF GCSE Art and Design

    Assessment objective 3 - Practical development Experiment with different processes, materials and techniques. Which process works and what do I want to keep - include study sketches, photos etc. to...

  3. GCSE Art and Design

    Easy-to-understand homework and revision materials for your GCSE Art and Design AQA '9-1' studies and exams

  4. GCSE Art Outline homework- 1 page year 10

    Learning skills in Art Acrylic painting with card - Viera Da silva painting layers and using Gold - Victoria Crowe Photocopy drawing with Chila Burman Klimt patterns Transfer medium with Robert Rauschenberg Tim Burton drawings and fantasy art Printing with Angie Mitchell relief prints Figure drawing and simplification using Henry Moore City stre...

  5. GCSE Art Homework tasks

    GCSE Art Homework tasks Subject: Art and design Age range: 14-16 Resource type: Worksheet/Activity File previews pptx, 2.5 MB A Selection of homework tasks linked to the projects available on my profile- Ideal for Holiday tasks. -3D heads -Circus project -Other Cultures -Seashore -Gothic Architecture

  6. GCSE Art and Design

    Edexcel Eduqas OCR GCSE Art and Design learning resources for adults, children, parents and teachers.

  7. PDF GCSE Art and Design

    The design, prototyping and modelling or making of products, objects, and environments, using intellectual, creative and practical skills. Areas of study could include sculpture, ceramics, product design, jewellery design and 3D digital design. Photography. Produce images using light-sensitive materials such as photographic film, or digital ...

  8. AQA

    1 2 Showing 36 results Scheme of work: Three-dimensional Design Published 20 Sep 2023 | DOCX | 93 KB Scheme of work: Graphic communication Published 20 Sep 2023 | DOCX | 102 KB Scheme of work: Photography Published 20 Sep 2023 | DOCX | 94 KB Scheme of work: Fine art Published 20 Sep 2023 | DOCX | 449 KB Scheme of work: Art, craft and design

  9. GCSE Art Scheme of Work: The Blue Planet

    GCSE Art Scheme of Work: The Blue Planet Posted on May 16, 2018 by art_teacher_mcr My GCSE Art students have been working on an art project titled The Blue Planet. We designed this project to be open-ended so students could work independently and really stretch their ideas.

  10. GCSE Art Project: Drypoint Etching

    Posted on November 9, 2021 by art_teacher_mcr. I designed this GCSE art drypoint etching project with the intention of having students understand the different applications of mark-making drawing techniques, and getting an insight into a simple but effective printing process. The drypoint etching technique is one of my favourites as it is so ...

  11. GCSE Art 'Homework Menu'

    The menu features a list of different possible homework tasks within the categories: Finishing off, Getting ahead in lessons, Practicing to improve skills and Learning new skills, and the idea is that students choose their own homework. Tes paid licence How can I reuse this?

  12. GCSE Art Project

    GCSE Art Project - Skills Training. This GCSE Art Project is the first I teach when students start in Year 10 (KS4). Essentially, I wanted to develop and enhance the range of skills that students have been taught at KS3, enabling them to master and improve in a way that was engaging yet simple to achieve. There are some 'essential' GCSE ...

  13. 5 Top-tips to survive the Art workload (from a GCSE A*/grade 9 student

    Currently many Year 9s and 10s are starting their GCSE Art coursework and the pressure is starting to mount, with large amounts of homework and stressful classwork. Generally GCSE Art is a real shock to the system and, by Christmas, a handful of students can feel overwhelmed by the amount of work and others fall behind very quickly.

  14. 5 Top-tips to survive the Art workload

    Note: I did the AQA Art GCSE course in 2016/17. I am basing this article on the AQA art courses (specifically the Art & Design course) but I have also read the specification for the new 9-1 course, so the information given and the skills I have learnt are 100% applicable for the exams taught from September 2016 (with exams starting in June 2018).

  15. Moscow School of Painting (c.1500-1700): Icons, Murals

    For earlier styles of Medieval painting in Russia, please see our article on the Novgorod School of Icon Painting (1100-1500). For later painting styles from the 17th century, see: Petrine art (1686-1725) in St Petersburg, under Tsar Peter the Great. This introduced Russian Painting (18th century), dominated by religious murals and portraiture.

  16. Art Summer Homework GCSE

    pdf, 4.18 MB 100% Ready to download, print out and use! Several hours of focused tasks to keep your cohort busy all summer all on one page! -10 different summer Art challenges to inspire, engage and enthuse your students towards success in their Art GCSE. -Each is linked to the Art GCSE Assessment Objectives

  17. Pavel Tretyakov, Russian Art Collector: Founder of Tretyakov Gallery Moscow

    Pavel Tretyakov (1832-1898) Arguably the greatest-ever collector of Russian art, Pavel Tretyakov initially collected European works before specializing in paintings by Russian artists. A wealthy merchant and industrialist, he made a fortune from textiles and spent much of it on his art collection. Almost from the very beginning, his patronage ...

  18. Dmitri Prigov

    5 November 1940, Moscow—16 July 2007, Moscow. Dmitri Prigov, who died in 2007, is esteemed equally by Slavic scholars and by artists of various generations, from the founding Moscow Conceptualists to the very youngest. A few days before his death he was to participate in a performance dedicated to him by the ultra-radical group Voina (War ...

  19. GCSE ART. Home Learning Student Guides to developing Component 1

    pdf, 1.42 MB pdf, 561.95 KB Ideal to email to students for them to use to develop work at home during this difficult time. Four different step by step guides to developing thorough sketchbooks that cover the requirements of the GCSE Art specification. All four Assessment Objectives are thoroughly addressed.

  20. Marc Chagall and Jewish Theater, Part Two

    The Murals for the Jewish Theater, Part Two. Perhaps because he was the first to visually imagine a totally Yiddish world, mystical and magical, sophisticated and folkish, avant-garde and traditional, Marc Chagall's ability to capture the modernity of a new Jewish identity left a mark on Yiddish theater in Moscow.

  21. ART Student Guide to Developing a GCSE Sketchbook

    Age range: 14-16 Resource type: Worksheet/Activity File previews pdf, 1.47 MB A step by step guide for students, leading them through the development of a GCSE Art sketchbook. This resource focusses on covering the Assessment Objectives and helps students see how their work can evolve.

  22. GCSE Art

    All GCSE Art projects must include artist studies. This gives students an idea of what is expected through visual examples by real students, as well as a clear set of graded outcome descriptors and success criteria checklist. Free printable worksheet/ homework task on the last slide to give structure for written analysis.